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598BBC
September 3rd, 2010, 12:06
just curious if anyone may have the correct procedure for a Treatment of Seafoam.. the additive to the Fuel tank is pretty self explaind.. But I have heard various other treatments, such as a direct usage thru the throttle body..just wondering how much? assumming higher rpm instead of just idling, any info is appreciated.. Trying to smog a renix that failed on the Nox side, replacing EGR, and was wanting to do this treatment also. Thanks for any input

01_XJ
September 3rd, 2010, 13:22
I've pulled the vacuum hose on the brake booster while the engine is running and use it to suck the seafoam out of the can. If you do it though, make sure to hold your finger over part of the can opening to regulate how much it sucks out because it will shut off the engine if too much goes in at once. Towards the end I usually let it suck in a bunch to kill it on purpose, then let it sit for a few minutes and start it up again.

tharlanjr
September 3rd, 2010, 13:25
/\/\/\/\/\/\
This.

I do it the same way, usually let it soak up half the bottle. Let it sit for 15 min then take it for a drive. Mine smoked like crazy. You can also put it in your oil like 50 miles before you change it. Just make sure you change it...

mtndew
September 3rd, 2010, 15:07
how about for those of us with no brake booster (abs)? where would you put it then?

aparke4
September 3rd, 2010, 15:17
there is still a hose that runs from the brakes to the manifold i believe - i did it in my old 97 xj with abs and have done it in my 99 with out abs.

mtndew
September 3rd, 2010, 15:19
mines got the crappy bendix 9 abs. but isnt there a capped off vacuum line somewhere for if it did have a vacuum booster? where is that? or is there a better way?

ReverendOD
September 3rd, 2010, 15:21
The new seafoam aresol cans have a applicator tip that is curved. You place it into the throttle body end of the air box tube and it sprays it into the throttle body. A much better way to even distribute it into the engine.

http://www.seafoamsales.com/sea-foam-spray.html (http://www.seafoamsales.com/sea-foam-spray.html)

http://www.seafoamsales.com/images/stories/how-to/hook-guide.jpg

Locate the engine throttle body and remove air intake boot. Install the Sea Foam cleaning tube by inserting the short end of the hook guide into the throttle body, positioning the tube directly in front of the throttle plate. Ideal placement of hook guide is at top center of throttle body housing (12 o’clock.) Place end of cleaning tube within ” of throttle plate by adjusting cleaning tube in or out of hook guide. Replace air intake boot to hold cleaning tube assembly in place.
With the vehicle in park or neutral and parking brake engaged start engine and increase idle speed 500 to 1000 RPM above factory idle specification. Increasing engine RPM is important for the following reasons:

The Sea Foam cleaner must be evenly distributed
The Sea Foam cleaner must fully atomize
The Sea Foam cleaner must pass through the throttle body, not the air by-pass
Find a method to hold engine RPM steady as this application takes approximately 5 minutes
After can of Sea Foam has been used, approximately 2-3 minutes, stop spray, return engine to normal idle speed and shut off engine.
Remove cleaning tube from throttle body and reattach air inlet boot to throttle body and tighten clamp.
Let vehicle sit about 5 minutes then restart in a well ventilated area, as exhaust may be extreme for a short time. Road test, driving aggressively, to remove any remaining carbon.

mtndew
September 3rd, 2010, 16:48
so how would i go about doing it with a non aresol can? mainly which vacuum line besides the brake booster line?

ReverendOD
September 3rd, 2010, 16:53
so how would i go about doing it with a non aresol can? mainly which vacuum line besides the brake booster line?

Whatever vac line is closest to the cetner of the intake, or... just slowly pour it down the throttle body. As long as the line goes to the intake it wont matter.

01_XJ
September 3rd, 2010, 19:42
There's an aerosol bottle of it? My local Walmart and Kragen both only stock the non-aerosol kind. Anyway, like someone else mentioned, if you don't have a brake booster, then just find another vac line to the intake. Are there really XJ's out there without power brakes?

bert01xj
September 3rd, 2010, 20:42
i have never use sea foam deep creep just the standard white can and poured it in the tb at a slow speed. use about a third to half the can no need to raise the rpms. may sound like its going to die but doesn't. make sure when you turn the motor back on your outside and not near open windows. it should smoke pretty good. and if you put it in the oil you could end up with a leak because it cleaned out what was clogging the leak.i did it with no problems and your oil will come out looking horrible

dellstopjeep
September 3rd, 2010, 21:11
we just started getting the new cans in at o-reillys recently. Should be permanent once the old cans run out

kf_chris
September 3rd, 2010, 21:28
I've heard it can foul O2 sensors. and I usually Seafoam it before I change plugs
Used it on a few vehicles and they all smoked bad, but immediately started running better.

mtndew
September 3rd, 2010, 22:21
Are there really XJ's out there without power brakes?

it has power brakes (supposed to anyway). it just uses pressurized brake fluid from the peice of **** abs system instead of a normal vacuum booster

NeXJ
September 3rd, 2010, 23:09
/\/\/\/\/\/\
This.

I do it the same way, usually let it soak up half the bottle. Let it sit for 15 min then take it for a drive. Mine smoked like crazy. You can also put it in your oil like 50 miles before you change it. Just make sure you change it...



OOPS!!! I put it in my oil then drove 800 miles... did I damage something? I changed it right after though... it was a continuous 800 miles.

RCP Phx
September 4th, 2010, 06:56
we just started getting the new cans in at o-reillys recently. Should be permanent once the old cans run out

They are not going to discontinue the pour in style since its still used for other uses like in your gas tank!

bert01xj
September 4th, 2010, 15:15
I've heard it can foul O2 sensors. and I usually Seafoam it before I change plugs
Used it on a few vehicles and they all smoked bad, but immediately started running better.

i have done it at least three times never failed 02 or pluges

Johnnie Walker
September 4th, 2010, 18:14
OOPS!!! I put it in my oil then drove 800 miles... did I damage something? I changed it right after though... it was a continuous 800 miles.
You should be okay, just change your coil asap now.

Glenn B
September 4th, 2010, 18:56
Coil, eh? :twak:

You should be okay, just change your coil asap now.

hubs97xj
September 4th, 2010, 20:20
I'm curious as to why so many people say you have to immediately change the oil after putting Sea Foam in. I've seen people say they've run it in engines for the normal change intervals without issue, and there's nothing on the website about needing to change it immediately. Is it because of the chance of the dissolved crap clogging the filter, or what exactly?

NeXJ
September 4th, 2010, 20:24
You should be okay, just change your coil asap now.

But I don't HAVE a coil.. it's EFI...!!! haha. No - I did FIRST thing. I gotta say - the thing seems to be running INSANELY well right now... SUPER SMOOTH!!!!!! Hopefully I haven't screwed the motor up in some deeper way. But all is good so far... maybe driving 800 miles in 5th gear is a little like driving 50 miles around town...

kf_chris
September 4th, 2010, 20:31
i have done it at least three times never failed 02 or pluges


Well I have done it about 15 times on 4 vehicles and never had the problem.
I have, however, heard of this issue on other forums with other guys having that happen as a result of Seafoam.

It was just a warning, and information, more of which is better than less

kf_chris
September 4th, 2010, 20:33
I'm curious as to why so many people say you have to immediately change the oil after putting Sea Foam in. I've seen people say they've run it in engines for the normal change intervals without issue, and there's nothing on the website about needing to change it immediately. Is it because of the chance of the dissolved crap clogging the filter, or what exactly?

I personally don't have any research into leaving it in, I just don't want to run that stuff in my oil regularly, never have. I put it in and drive it about 10 miles then change the oil. And when my engine was taken apart for the stroker build everything inside was VERY clean

Johnnie Walker
September 5th, 2010, 13:09
But I don't HAVE a coil.. it's EFI...!!! haha. No - I did FIRST thing. I gotta say - the thing seems to be running INSANELY well right now... SUPER SMOOTH!!!!!! Hopefully I haven't screwed the motor up in some deeper way. But all is good so far... maybe driving 800 miles in 5th gear is a little like driving 50 miles around town...

Yes, it was a typo. And someone else caught it before I did.
As far as running it through change intervals, on the bottle it says you can. But, the fact that it is a solvent, means that it can break down the oil. Most I have ever gone was 1000 miles, and that was not on purpose.

NeXJ
September 5th, 2010, 13:18
Yeah- I think we were just having fun with your typo... not to worry or be taken personally...!

The thing about solvents is... well... every quart of oil you put in is also a solvent. A solvent simply means that one solution will mix with another solution. And hence water is a solvent for, let's say, lemonade - since lemonade is made up of water. So- being a solvent alone does not mean the oil will lose it's lubricating properties. Seafoam IS a petroleum product - but since has VERY LOW viscosity it will reduce the viscosity of the oil in the crankcase, once well mixed. I think that's the only threat... and that is what allows the carbon busting to happen.

I think the way it really works is that seafoam is a petroleum product whose long chain carbons have been separated out - and hence it READILY combines with the carbon build-up in the engine and therefore reduces the problems created by such buildup...

heyhar
September 5th, 2010, 17:06
And their lawyers probably made them put that warning on the can. Yes, it is a petroleum distillate, more than likely high detergent, and fully soluble in oil, but you wouldn't want to run the Indy 500 with it. But, it's only 500 miles!

NeXJ
September 5th, 2010, 19:50
well... I'm just saying that if something is a solvent - IN GENERAL - that means it won't be dangerous to the host solution... i.e. wont' break down the host solution... the worst that can happen is thin it...

and NO of course you don't want EVER to run seafoam IN PLACE of oil except it was maybe one second at 200 RPM (i.e. a couple revolutions)

hubs97xj
September 5th, 2010, 20:05
Hmm, guess I could have read the rest of their webpage. So we're talking 9oz of Sea Foam in 192oz of oil. I run 10W30 year round, and I doubt the viscosity is reduced enough to cause problems- but at 160K and counting, I'll probably still stick to doing it periodically before an oil change anyway. I'd be more concerned with loading the filter with sludge than oil viscosity, but I was curious about the warnings about using it in the crankcase.


To clean oil rings and lifters, add 1 oz. Sea Foam to each quart of oil. Sea Foam will slowly re-liquefy the old oil varnish residue that builds up on lifters and rings and prevents them from functioning normally. This process can be done as part of a pre service cleaning by adding the Sea Foam to the oil at least 30 miles before the next oil change interval. OR it can be done as a preventative maintenance process without changing the oil. You can leave Sea Foam in the oil indefinitely as long as the oil is clean. The addition of a high-detergent oil like Sea Foam may cause the oil to become dirty faster than normal as buildup oil residue and contamination are cleaned. Check the oil at regular intervals and when it gets dirty, change it.