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Tools and Garages This is a place to share about the tools and workspaces used to craft your latest masterpiece.

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  #16  
Old July 6th, 2008, 14:24
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razdrvr razdrvr is offline
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Re: I wanna do my own fabrication

It's not the extra cost of the welder that I'm basing my decision on, it's the hassle of having 220 run out to my garage.
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  #17  
Old July 6th, 2008, 15:28
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ehall ehall is offline
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Re: I wanna do my own fabrication

Quote:
Originally Posted by TNT
A good 220 MIG will run circles around a 110 MIG on sheetmetal.
I said stick not MIG

Back to the OP, 110v flux core is plenty for newbie work, and is great as a second small sheetmetal welder later if you upgrade to bigger
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  #18  
Old July 6th, 2008, 17:11
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TNT TNT is offline
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Re: I wanna do my own fabrication

Quote:
Originally Posted by ehall
The 110-volt flux core is better at sheet metal than the higher end stuff, because it won't burn through as easily. I have a little 125 EZ right now and plan to get a stick eventually, but will keep the little one for body panel work.
I quoted you as a reply to the OP, not you. All I said was this..

Quote:
Originally Posted by TNT
A good 220 MIG will run circles around a 110 MIG on sheetmetal. Get the 220volt one it's worth the extra money.
If I was replying to you it would have been more like this... Most 220 MIGs will have a finer adjustment range which works great on sheetmetal. Some are even set-up for use as a spotwelder. They will also weld much thicker steel without having to clean up all the flux core/slag from your welds. You can also do nice aluminum welds with the 220 mig too. There is no need for 2 welders and cleaning up slag sucks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ehall
I said stick not MIG

Back to the OP, 110v flux core is plenty for newbie work, and is great as a second small sheetmetal welder later if you upgrade to bigger
I was posting it the OP, stating that buying a good 220 MIG will run circles around a 110 MIG on sheetmetal.

I was stating that it will weld sheetmetal better. If he bought the 220 MIG he would have no need for a stick welder since it will weld thick steel like you plan on doing.

The main reason for a stick welder on a 4x4 is for welding cast iron. In this case should get a AC/DC stick welder.
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  #19  
Old July 6th, 2008, 17:24
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razdrvr razdrvr is offline
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Re: I wanna do my own fabrication

Maybe it's time to find an electrician.
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  #20  
Old July 6th, 2008, 17:36
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TNT TNT is offline
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Re: I wanna do my own fabrication

Quote:
Originally Posted by razdrvr
Maybe it's time to find an electrician.
Have him run wiring for a 220v air compressor too.

I have even an extra outlet for a future plasma cutter.

Paying for the electrician once is always cheaper.
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  #21  
Old July 6th, 2008, 17:41
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razdrvr razdrvr is offline
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Re: I wanna do my own fabrication

LOL, I always seem to find Pandora's box.
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  #22  
Old July 6th, 2008, 20:42
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_MURDERED OUT_ _MURDERED OUT_ is offline
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Re: I wanna do my own fabrication

got any electrician buddies???? I know i do....
Oh and if your set on that hobart welder here is one for sale:
http://www.pirate4x4.com/forum/showthread.php?t=696213
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  #23  
Old July 6th, 2008, 22:40
xjjeeper19 xjjeeper19 is offline
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Re: I wanna do my own fabrication

Just get a 220v machine and forget it. I went threw this about a year ago. I ended up going with a lincoln sp 175T. I've been running it on argon/c02 mix, and .035 wire. With this setup I have welded all kinds of stuff. If this machine won't weld it, my millermatic 35 will.

Ditch the Flux core 110 machines and just buy a 220...you won't regret it.
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  #24  
Old July 7th, 2008, 15:13
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_MURDERED OUT_ _MURDERED OUT_ is offline
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Re: I wanna do my own fabrication

I just bought a 40 amp plasma cutter for $202.50 !!
Can't wait to see what this thing can do.
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  #25  
Old July 18th, 2008, 15:41
scorpion scorpion is offline
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Re: I wanna do my own fabrication

When considering a 220 machine over a 110 machine, you should really look at two factors.

First is Duty Cycle: 110 machines can be used to weld cages. I've done it personally and it's slow going. You weld until the machine essentially shuts down and then you wait until it cools off before you can start again.

Heat for penetration: In most cases you can generate enough heat to weld up to 3/16" safely with the 110v machines if you know how to weld. Some might argue they have welded thicker but take that with a grain of salt. 110v machines typically cannot generate enough heat to weld the thicker stuff although it is possible with multiple passes. If you intend on welding things to your differentials, welding shackle mounts into bumpers, and any other welding that would require thicker material, you probably want a 220 machine.

Hobart or Miller (same company now - Hobart are the ecomony welders and do work well) are good welders and a great starter welder is a 175 - 185 depending on what year machine you buy. They are good middle of the road machines that will last for quite some time. If you wish to step it up a notch, look at the Miller 210 - 212's. They are a production worthy machine that doesn't cost an arm and a leg and is able to weld the thick stuff. If you have money burning a hole in your pocket OR you wish to buy a big dog, look at the Miller 252. I have it's older brother the 250x and it welds like new with many miles on it.

If you're curious, the difference between Miller and Lincon is preference only. I've only had Millers and I like them but there are those that have only had Lincon and feel the same way about them.

The good news is, if you buy a good welder, someone will always buy yours if you no longer need/use it.

Good Luck.
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  #26  
Old July 18th, 2008, 16:29
scorpion scorpion is offline
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Re: I wanna do my own fabrication

For benders and dies:

If you like cages or bumpers, you'll probably want a 1 3/4" die in the 6.5" to 7" radius range. That would be my first die set. The second would likely be 1 1/2" tube in the smallest radius offered. With these two you can build just about anything.

As for a bender, you have to decide how easy you want to make things on yourself. The JD benders and Pro Tools 105 bender are great benders and work very well. I've had both over the years and they work about the same (less gadget differences). Upgrading them to air over hydraulic is possible and doing so will result in a very nice bender and fairly repeatable bends. The downside to this type of bender (manual or air over hydro) is that you must rest the die pin to bend angles larger than ~25% (that's a guess honestly). This can result in repeatability issues (making the same bend twice) as the material can slip, rotate, or basically move when resetting the pin. The upside is that you can bend greater than 180* if you need to.

If you plan on getting a air over hydraulic setup the Pro Tools HB 302 (aka One Shot) is an excellent choice and ends up being less expensive when compared to the other style benders on air/hydro.



Shown above and found at http://www.pro-tools.com/302.htm, you can start your bend and go up to 110* in a single shot - thus the name one shot. No slippage, no rotation, and no moving because the pin does not need to be rest. they are simple machines and have less wear points when compared to the others. The way the bender operates makes it easier to support the material and start your bend as well.

There are other companies that sell similar machines and it may be worth your time to check out the following sites to compare types of machines and prices:

http://www.pro-tools.com
http://www.tricktools.com

Regarding plasma cutters...different than a welder. You want to buy the biggest one you can afford as the bigger the machine, the faster and cleaner your cut will be. A little 110V machine will have to hack through 1/8" and a (220 amp example) Powermax 1000 can cut 1/8" about as fast as you can move your torch. Anyone who has used both can tell you the difference.

Basic other fab tools will be required. I can't live without my 4.5" angle grinder. A chop saw can work but a small bandsaw works better (less sparks, noise, and health issues). A torch is a good idea as you'll always have to cut something off (if you don't have a plasma). A drill hand drill can work with a vise but a drill press is much better and safer.

Good luck. Years ago I started with a chop saw, a torch, a 110v welder, and a 4.5" angle grinder. You have to start somewhere.
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  #27  
Old July 18th, 2008, 16:40
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razdrvr razdrvr is offline
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Re: I wanna do my own fabrication

Thanks, I've actually ordered and received the metal fabricators hand book and the bend-tech pro software. The book seems to have alot of good information. The software takes some getting used to but I think I'll learn to like it. Now just need to get home and start doing some hands on stuff.
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  #28  
Old July 27th, 2008, 11:50
slcpunk74 slcpunk74 is offline
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Re: I wanna do my own fabrication

Quote:
Originally Posted by _MURDERED OUT_
I just bought a 40 amp plasma cutter for $202.50 !!
Can't wait to see what this thing can do.
where did you get that and what is it you lucky dog?
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  #29  
Old March 21st, 2021, 19:52
Wikkid98xj Wikkid98xj is offline
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Re: I wanna do my own fabrication

IMHO fcaw machine burns to hot for thin sheet metal I would rather a 220 gas mig for sheet metal I have an Amazon special 160 a 110v. I bought to build my smoker and it was plenty hot enough to weld a propane tank and definitely up to burning 5/16 together permanently
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