PDA

View Full Version : Anyone in the navy or navy recruiters here in So Cal??


XbajajeepX
August 27th, 2008, 14:10
I just got a call from my sister and I guess my nephew is going to join the Navy. I was wondering if there was anyone on here that has any advice I can give him before he signs any contracts. I'm all for him signing up, but I don't want the recruiter telling him he's going to do something and he gets stuck doing something else, if you know what I mean.... He's crazy smart so I know he will score high on whatever tests he has to take.... Any advice is appreciated.. Thanks..

cds36
August 27th, 2008, 14:36
Being Ex Military Army "infantry"

First rule make sure your MOS is something you can use in the civilan world. I cant use any of my training I had here "cant blow anything up" " cant rappelle out of helo's" "cant shoot anyone" unless I want to be a cop "which i dont have the patience to be".

Second dont settle for something you dont want to do. they will say oh you qualify for this or would be good in this field " thats bullshit" if you want a particular job get it in writing. They will say oh once your in you can transfer or it will be easy to change jobs, its not.

GI Bill is a must even if you dont go to school you can still work the system and get your money lol but you didnt hear that from me....

XbajajeepX
August 27th, 2008, 14:44
thanks... He wants to become a Helo mechanic... I'm just waiting to see what they say to him after he takes his tests....

cds36
August 27th, 2008, 14:45
Cannot stress enough GET IT IN WRITING!!

Darky
August 27th, 2008, 14:51
Yeah, definitely get it in the contract. I signed on to be a helo mech in the Marine Corps, they offered a bonus to switch to avionics, with a chance for a non-aircraft related electronics field. Guess what, I got the non-aircraft related field.

besthaticouldo
August 27th, 2008, 14:59
get it in writing is correct.

lol

HawkZero
August 27th, 2008, 15:04
I just got a call from my sister and I guess my nephew is going to join the Navy. I was wondering if there was anyone on here that has any advice I can give him before he signs any contracts. I'm all for him signing up, but I don't want the recruiter telling him he's going to do something and he gets stuck doing something else, if you know what I mean.... He's crazy smart so I know he will score high on whatever tests he has to take.... Any advice is appreciated.. Thanks..

I've been active duty Navy since 1993. Started out as a E1 and now am much farther along.

A term of service in the Armed Forces is a pretty good place for everyone to start their adult life, and a GREAT place for someone that needs a bit more structure in life as they develop a little more maturity. However, getting in and getting what you want can be a tricky game. First piece of advice...take it slowly and remember that the recruiters are salesman.

Rule 1: Don't let him go alone! No real business gets conducted at the recruiting center...its more prescreening but he should definitely have company. The processing station he usually has to go alone...unfortunately thats where the papers are signed.
Rule 2: There is no reason to "sign now this is a limited time offer" Any good deal will always be available. Right now this is a "buyers market" for enlistments.
Rule 3: I'm not endorsing fraudulent enlistments, but the correct answers at the processing center are "No, None and Never".
Rule 4: Bottom line is that its his decision.

That being said, I can offer the following specific guidance.

The process starts when a potential recruit goes to the office. The recruiters job is to sell the Navy and prescreen candidates. THATS IT...period...end of story. Prescreening will determine with a quick interview whether the recruit is grossly unqualified for medical or social reasons. IE: Felon, educational background, medically disqualified. This is when its important to know things like asthma are disqualifying as is drugs, felonies etc. Medically its best to be vauge as possible and answer NO to everything unless there is hard evidence of a diagnosis by a medical professional. For example - having a cramp while swimming once when you were 12 does not equal YES to "Have you ever had leg or abdominal cramps?" Running out of breath while running in 2nd grade does not equal YES to ashtma or shortness of breath. In comparison, having to use an albuterol inhaler = Yes to asthma. Anyway, you get the idea.

The recruiter has no say in what jobs are available or what he gets so don't bother getting into a conversation about that.

If he hasn't takent the ASVAB test he will probably do it there. Its not a question of easy or hard, but its mostly designed to flush out his strongest talents. Some jobs require certain scores such as mechanical or secretarial aptitude. Don't worry about this part...just answer the questions.

If he has minimaly qualifying ASVAB scores and is conditionally qualified, an appointment will be made to go to the nearest Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS). This is where the magic happens! The day is long, stressful and hard and usually ends with the recruit having to make a life altering decision when they are hungry, tired and very stressed out. Best way to deal with this is to be prepared with knowledge and to be told despite anything somebody may tell them that its okay to walk away if they don't like the deal.

Day starts at 4am. Usually first half of day is spent in the physical exam and background interviews. More medical questions etc where No None and Never are appropriate answers. Second half is spent either doing specialty exams for language schools or nuke power etc. Finally, they meet with a detailer. This is the guy that has the high pressure speech. His job is to get you signed up for a job that the Navy needs filled rather than what the recruit wants. Remember BUYERS MARKET! Hold out for what you want! They will use every angle such as "That job isn't available right now" or "You can transfer into that job once you get in". Just say no and tell them to call when the job is available...then walk out. Believe you me, by the time he gets to the door the job will suddenly become available. There may be a delay until boot camp starts...but they will not lose a recruit to something as silly as a closed out job.

All that being said, its important that the recruit KNOW what they want before hand. I can't offer much career choice unless I talk to your nephew. There are lots of tradeoffs in the different jobs. Adventure over techincal skill and quality of life etc. The only thing for certain is that the first few years are HARD. Lots of pitfalls are out there such as getting girls preggo, debt and falling in with the wrong crowd. Overall, you will get out what you put in.

I'll be happy to answer any questions either on this thread of IM/phone.

silverslk
August 27th, 2008, 15:10
I was Navy from 92-96. Only thing I can say is don't let him fall for the "you can join (they call it unrated) and see what other jobs do and then strike for it" TRANSLATION: you will be stripping and painting the ship and applying for jobs when they aren't working your ass 12-14 hours a day. I saw those people who fell for that and they HATED it. Make sure he picks a job BEFORE he signs up. Also, make the recruiter read him EVERY job he is qualified for. I did this and then picked the first one he read (he was pissed but it paid off).

HawkZero
August 27th, 2008, 15:13
thanks... He wants to become a Helo mechanic... I'm just waiting to see what they say to him after he takes his tests....

The Navy doesn't have "helo mechanics" but they do have lots of aviation jobs. What platform he works on gets determined after he goes to school and it is more or less a crap shoot. The type of work is determined by system:

Aviation Structural Mechanic = airframe components and hyrdaulics
Aviation Machinists Mate = Powerplants
Aviation Electronics Tech = Avionics
Aviation Electricians Mate = Aircraft Electrician
you get the idea but the full list is here:

http://usmilitary.about.com/od/enlistedjob1/a/navyjobs.htm

I can offer more advice about each rate if you have questions. In general in the aviation rates you will spend the majority of your first enlistment in a sea duty billet. That means attached to either a squadron or ship and deploying on a regular basis. Life for a junior sailor on a ship is HARD with little to no privacy and long days with little time off.

ScottyDog
August 27th, 2008, 15:26
I just got a call from my sister and I guess my nephew is going to join the Navy. I was wondering if there was anyone on here that has any advice I can give him before he signs any contracts. I'm all for him signing up, but I don't want the recruiter telling him he's going to do something and he gets stuck doing something else, if you know what I mean.... He's crazy smart so I know he will score high on whatever tests he has to take.... Any advice is appreciated.. Thanks..

My brother was in the Navy and went in 'undesignated'....:shocked: (NO MOS) He got lucky and struck an awesome job as a Radioman on board the U.S.S. John C. Stennis.

Mil Spec - Civilian
Radioman - Network Admin

He advised it was the greatest thing he did on his own. Plus he got to see the world....

Pros: Airconditioned office (Actually its an ice box so they can keep their servers cool) Great for when its 100* with 100% humidity on deck.

Con: Correct me if I'm wrong... but I believe this civilian field is saturated.... but it beats flippin burgers!

sherman08
August 27th, 2008, 15:26
I just did this a couple of months ago. it sounds like he has a good idea of what he wants to do so that wont be a problem. If he's smart he'll have no problem getting whatever he wants. Just remember when your at the MEPS that you should just take it easy. Dont get intimidated, or stressed out, thats what it's there for. Medicall screening is long but simple, dont let them scare you with "fraudulant enlistment." O and by the way... in the dock tells him to bend over and spread them its OK, the seal wont be broken... but seriously be open minded when choosing your job in regards to having a secondary choice or a lenient ship schedule, this will help take away from the stress. I signed like last month and now i dont ship till March, you can always wait a bit for an opening.

Grover728
August 27th, 2008, 23:23
I was a navy nuke electrician for 8 years. I can answer any questions in that field.

Ryan93
August 27th, 2008, 23:31
Im looking into the Navy as well but i dont plan on going in enlisted i want to be a NFO or a Pilot

HawkZero
August 27th, 2008, 23:56
Im looking into the Navy as well but i dont plan on going in enlisted i want to be a NFO or a Pilot

PM me ASAP.

xDUMPTRUCKx
August 28th, 2008, 08:00
Its amazing how much you can get from the recruiters especially when they need bodies, I recommend going to a very small town to sign up. Those recruiters will be hurting badly.

They offer contractual agreements on choice of SPECIFIC MOS rather than a MOS field

Choice of duty station.

Stupid sign on bonuses from $30-$50k.

Mad cash for college.

They offer contract E4 from the start, don't let them tell you they don't i just saw my friend enlist and that was part of his contract that upon successful completion of his school he would be E4.


Like what HawkZero said, the balls in his court.....


Oh and if he wants to step up to the men's department of the navy I can have him hooked up with a very sweet job field that they can't seem to keep people in because everyone is getting out and making $300k a year......

HawkZero
August 28th, 2008, 08:32
Its amazing how much you can get from the recruiters especially when they need bodies, I recommend going to a very small town to sign up. Those recruiters will be hurting badly.

They offer contractual agreements on choice of SPECIFIC MOS rather than a MOS field

Choice of duty station.

Stupid sign on bonuses from $30-$50k.

Mad cash for college.

They offer contract E4 from the start, don't let them tell you they don't i just saw my friend enlist and that was part of his contract that upon successful completion of his school he would be E4.


Like what HawkZero said, the balls in his court.....


Oh and if he wants to step up to the men's department of the navy I can have him hooked up with a very sweet job field that they can't seem to keep people in because everyone is getting out and making $300k a year......

Welcome home Dump Truck. I haven't been over there since 2005, but I can definitely remember how nice it was to come home!

I would caution against the small town recruiter advice because all those recruiters report to the same MEPS station. The recruiters MAY promise something, but its beyond their true scope of responsibility. The deals are made at MEPS. That being said, a large town the recruiters may have less time to sit down and explain things like sea/shore rotations, leave benefits and answer ALL questions.

markw
August 29th, 2008, 22:18
It doesn't really matter what recruiter recruits him. They'll all have similar goals, and similar ratings to fill. If he does good on the asvab, they'll want him to take a physics test to "qualify" for the nuke program. Nukes have a very high dropout rate and end up in the fleet undesignated. If they do make it through, then they have insane quals, really smart officers with no common sense telling them what to do, and generally a crap life onboard ship until the end of their enlistment. I was on a nuke ship and the nukes had it bad. Good news is that after 6 years of HELL, they can usually land a very well paying job in the civilian market.

The aircraft maintenance crews work long hours underway. The bird is always in the air, and every XXX hours of operation, they have to do various maintenance items on it. Generally much better life than the nukes, but if he's deployed, it's cat naps while the helo is flying, and maintenance when it's not flying. Think of it as wrenching on your jeep between wheeling trips, but with 4 hours of sleep a night. :) It'll make him marketable outside the navy, and give some good skills.

The recruiters are going to be pushing ratings that they need to fill. If he sees something he thinks he might be good at and qualifies for, the recruiter will put him in as that rating, but he may need to be pushed to do it. Ie, the push is for cooks, but he wants something technical. They'll say it's "not available" and that's when he tells them, then I'm not signing. The recruiter will make a phone call and amazingly, they can get him what he wants. :)

Make sure he has an A school on paper. That will get him to the fleet in a speciality, where he won't have to go to deck and then "strike" out of deck to get a job he likes. If he goes undesignated, he'll gain mad skills at grinding, chipping and painting rust.

If you have any questions, there's a few of us here that are prior service, or are currently active duty. If he does join, tell him to consider 20. It goes by extremely quick, and he'll have income for the rest of his life.

Grover728
August 30th, 2008, 00:59
Being a nuke was not that bad Mark. :bs:

rpraterxj
August 30th, 2008, 10:21
short and sweet -

get it in writing

get designated - MOS - sounds like he has the idea

get the GI Bill AND the Navy College Fund

get a sign-on bonus

Try to get bumped to E-2 or E-3 somehow after boot camp.


I served 4 years in the amphib Navvy as an Operational Specialist. Started as an E1 and made E5. Great experience!

Congrats to your nephew!

markw
August 31st, 2008, 09:46
Being a nuke was not that bad Mark. :bs:

Depends on when you were in, and what ship. Back in the late 80's early 90's, it sucked for surface nukes. Judging by them having the highest retention bonuses in the Navy, I can't imagine it got any better. Of course today, the only nukes are carriers and subs. The whole 5+ years (87-93) I was on the Truxtun (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Truxtun_(CGN-35)), the nukes never got a break. The best duty rotation they ever saw was 3 section, and in the yards where it was port/starboard (12/12) for over a year. The guys that dealt with it and got out are making GOOD money now. I'm just going by what I saw. I had buddies on the Texas, Arkansas, and California, which were all the same way. Of course, the whole nuke program is a different world from the rest of the Navy.

As for joining up, I'd do it again. He'll just have to remember, bootcamp is really to get people acclimated to a schedule, living in close quarters, and the most important part is to weed out/crack the people who won't make it.
It's 8 weeks and then he'll go to his schooling which is still pretty rigid/structured. Once he gets to the fleet, he just needs to have a good attitude, be where he's supposed to be when he's supposed to be there, and do a good job. If he does all that, he'll go far, and his seniors will look out for him. If he's just "along for the ride" or "just there for the college" and doing the minimum to survive, he'll hate it. Again, 20 years goes by quick, shore duty is great, and a current E6/E7 living in San Diego takes home the equivalent of someone making 75-80k a year. On paper they only make about half that, as most of it is "allowances" which aren't taxed. Pay doesn't start getting good until you've got 4+ years in and some sea time though.

The documentary I've seen was the Carrier city at sea or something like that which Discovery did. It had the guy with the bad attitude, plus showed some of the stuff everyone did, and was a pretty good representation of shipboard life. He just can't be the guy with the poor attitude.

Operation Specialists (OS's) like Robert usually had it pretty nice. I'm sure Robert can attest to what the engineers did. :) It's all what you make of it. Plus he'll get to see the world, and determine that the US isn't bad after all. :)

cds36
August 31st, 2008, 10:57
Depends on when you were in, and what ship. Back in the late 80's early 90's, it sucked for surface nukes. Judging by them having the highest retention bonuses in the Navy, I can't imagine it got any better. Of course today, the only nukes are carriers and subs. The whole 5+ years (87-93) I was on the Truxtun (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Truxtun_(CGN-35)), the nukes never got a break. The best duty rotation they ever saw was 3 section, and in the yards where it was port/starboard (12/12) for over a year. The guys that dealt with it and got out are making GOOD money now. I'm just going by what I saw. I had buddies on the Texas, Arkansas, and California, which were all the same way. Of course, the whole nuke program is a different world from the rest of the Navy.

As for joining up, I'd do it again. He'll just have to remember, bootcamp is really to get people acclimated to a schedule, living in close quarters, and the most important part is to weed out/crack the people who won't make it.
It's 8 weeks and then he'll go to his schooling which is still pretty rigid/structured. Once he gets to the fleet, he just needs to have a good attitude, be where he's supposed to be when he's supposed to be there, and do a good job. If he does all that, he'll go far, and his seniors will look out for him. If he's just "along for the ride" or "just there for the college" and doing the minimum to survive, he'll hate it. Again, 20 years goes by quick, shore duty is great, and a current E6/E7 living in San Diego takes home the equivalent of someone making 75-80k a year. On paper they only make about half that, as most of it is "allowances" which aren't taxed. Pay doesn't start getting good until you've got 4+ years in and some sea time though.

The documentary I've seen was the Carrier city at sea or something like that which Discovery did. It had the guy with the bad attitude, plus showed some of the stuff everyone did, and was a pretty good representation of shipboard life. He just can't be the guy with the poor attitude.

Operation Specialists (OS's) like Robert usually had it pretty nice. I'm sure Robert can attest to what the engineers did. :) It's all what you make of it. Plus he'll get to see the world, and determine that the US isn't bad after all. :)

I think I saw the same program it was pretty good, that guy was cleaning up shitters though, I dont see how you can be positive doing something you didnt sign up for, especially cleaning up someones elses sh_t. lol

xL8 APEKSx
August 31st, 2008, 12:02
Hawk Zero...

Your post was very enlightening. I could use some help in this area as well. I've been debating about joining Nat'l Gaurd (Air or Army) for years. I like the idea of the training, the money for school, and the discipline.

I don't like the idea of the unit reserved for guarding OUR nation is still being sent halfway across the world to fight civil wars for other countries. So because of this, I have held off on doing ANYTHING while GW Bush was in office. Please, I'm not trying to flame or start a political debate - I genuinely need advice here. It's just my personal opinion that the Nat'l Guard should...well...guard OUR nation. And that's what I'm willing to do.

So what are the odds of being deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan as an Air or Army Guardsman at this point? If I want to best my chances NOT to go over there, should I wait until the elections are over?

I'm 30, college educated, and would make an excellent soldier physically and mentally...but I want to help out stateside (unless our country is actually threatened), hence my choice to be a Guardsman.

Any advice is appreciated! :)

markw
August 31st, 2008, 13:30
I think I saw the same program it was pretty good, that guy was cleaning up shitters though, I dont see how you can be positive doing something you didnt sign up for, especially cleaning up someones elses sh_t. lol

Well, someone has to do it, and it usually rotates. That guy got on someones sh_t list. Yeah, there's lots of cleaning done in the navy, and the berthing is usually done by the junior guys. However, if someone's a dirtbag, he's delt with by the division.



I'm 30, college educated, and would make an excellent soldier physically and mentally...but I want to help out stateside (unless our country is actually threatened), hence my choice to be a Guardsman.


Heh, if Obama gets in, there's one word for the Military, (DOWNSIZE). It'll be like the Clinton era, 500 guys go up for the next paygrade, and 9 make it. :( If you don't want to deploy, join the coast guard or air force. :) Even without the war in Iraq which is winding down, the Navy has a continual presence over there. With a degree, you could go in as an Officer. Since you're 30 now, picture being retired at 50 with around 3500 a month being deposited every month in your bank account. That's at today's numbers, count inflation and it's probably going to be more like 5k/mo in 20 years. 2.5% per year * base pay is a good deal and the opportunities that it opens in the civilian world are great.

xL8 APEKSx
August 31st, 2008, 18:40
Thanks Mark...something to think about! :)

ScottyDog
August 31st, 2008, 19:13
Hey I agree this is all good information... My son graduates HS after this year. I'm not financially set up to send him off to college.. Yet he does have good potential, just somewhat cruising (lazy ass!) He's no honor student, but could have been if he just had more motivation... I don't want him to become stagnant after high school. I've been trying to coax him either into the Air Force or the Navy. One of my co-workers had the Navy pay for his daughters dental schooling, and after she was done went in and is a dentist/officer in the Navy.... At least this way the schooling is done and over with prior to service. Sorry, I really don't know how this all works, so if anyone can enlighten me and the group, I would really appreciate it..

Thanks,
Scott

blaisetd
August 31st, 2008, 19:50
GI Bill is a must even if you dont go to school you can still work the system and get your money lol but you didnt hear that from me....

Do tell...how can you get the money without going to school??

HawkZero
August 31st, 2008, 20:45
Hawk Zero...

Your post was very enlightening. I could use some help in this area as well. I've been debating about joining Nat'l Gaurd (Air or Army) for years. I like the idea of the training, the money for school, and the discipline.

I don't like the idea of the unit reserved for guarding OUR nation is still being sent halfway across the world to fight civil wars for other countries. So because of this, I have held off on doing ANYTHING while GW Bush was in office. Please, I'm not trying to flame or start a political debate - I genuinely need advice here. It's just my personal opinion that the Nat'l Guard should...well...guard OUR nation. And that's what I'm willing to do.

So what are the odds of being deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan as an Air or Army Guardsman at this point? If I want to best my chances NOT to go over there, should I wait until the elections are over?

I'm 30, college educated, and would make an excellent soldier physically and mentally...but I want to help out stateside (unless our country is actually threatened), hence my choice to be a Guardsman.

Any advice is appreciated! :)

As a 34 yr old who as been on active duty since age 19, I can appreciate your sense of duty and would like to help out if I could.

Unfortunately, the National Guard works a bit differently than normal recruiting and I've heard it more like rushing a frat than enlisting. However, I could be completely off base.

Something you might consider is taking a job in the reserves in a support role. For example, my wife has a school friend who's husband decided to join the Navy Reserve as a Supply Officer at age 32. He spends something like 2 weeks a year in Athens, GA and is still satisfied with his level of service.

My only advice no matter what your decision is since you have a degree, pursue some kind of commission in whatever service you choose.

Good luck with you decision and PM me anytime.

HawkZero
August 31st, 2008, 23:29
Just as an aside, there is a member that reads these boards that used to work as an Avionics Tech in my last squadron. Not trying to volunteer him or anything of that nature, but he will validate or raise the BS flag on anything I have written. (At least I would count on him to do that...)

Joe...if you have anything to add from your perspective please chime in. You went through this process much more recently than I have had a much longer career as a tech than I did.

XbajajeepX
August 31st, 2008, 23:46
Thanks a lot guys... all this info is helping him out a lot....

Now out of my own curiosity... If I were to get my BS in Aviation maintenance management, could I join the air force as an aircraft maintenance officer? I have no idea how it all works so that's why I ask... If that's the case then I might be making some new future plans.

markw
September 1st, 2008, 00:04
Generally, if you have a degree, you can enter on some sort of officer program and get a commission. There are age limits though. At one time it was 34 for enlisted to join. Not sure what it is now. I was enlisted, so I'm not quite sure on the details of how they bring officers in. I do have a cousin who's still active duty. She got the Navy to put her though med school. She owes an insane amount of years for it though. :)

In the end, if you ask anyone who stuck it out longer than 4 years, I think they'll pretty much tell you it was worth it. Also, ask guys who did 4 years and got out, but are now in their 50's, almost all of them will tell you they wish they'd stuck it out. I retired from the Navy Dec 2006, and my bank account hasn't missed a payment yet. :) I also get to remind my dad that I retired almost 2 years before he did. :) He keeps telling me that I had to go get a job, and I remind him that he's restoring VW's for money now. I walked out of the Navy and into a well paying IT job. Employers like ex military, because A) they're drug free, B) they show up, C) They show up on time, D) they can usually get a clearance since there's a good chance they got one in the service.

Hawk: sounds like you've been on carriers, how do they treat the nukes there?? :)

HawkZero
September 1st, 2008, 08:02
Generally, if you have a degree, you can enter on some sort of officer program and get a commission. There are age limits though. At one time it was 34 for enlisted to join. Not sure what it is now. I was enlisted, so I'm not quite sure on the details of how they bring officers in. I do have a cousin who's still active duty. She got the Navy to put her though med school. She owes an insane amount of years for it though. :)

In the end, if you ask anyone who stuck it out longer than 4 years, I think they'll pretty much tell you it was worth it. Also, ask guys who did 4 years and got out, but are now in their 50's, almost all of them will tell you they wish they'd stuck it out. I retired from the Navy Dec 2006, and my bank account hasn't missed a payment yet. :) I also get to remind my dad that I retired almost 2 years before he did. :) He keeps telling me that I had to go get a job, and I remind him that he's restoring VW's for money now. I walked out of the Navy and into a well paying IT job. Employers like ex military, because A) they're drug free, B) they show up, C) They show up on time, D) they can usually get a clearance since there's a good chance they got one in the service.

Hawk: sounds like you've been on carriers, how do they treat the nukes there?? :)

Can't say I spent much time with the deckplate nukes. The problem with being a nuke from my perspective is that even when the ship is in port, the reactor still has to operate. Therefore the nuke job is 24/7. The tradeoff for this kind of work is big bucks in bonuses, very fast advancement and very high paying jobs after an enlistment.

Grover728
September 1st, 2008, 16:10
Well I don't regret being in from 96-2004 as a nuke. I wish I could have stuck it out for 12 more years. The bonuses are huge...especially tax free. Carrier nukes get more time off than sub nukes, bigger crew. My problem was not coming up with a job as a chief(E-7) that I liked. There was no job that I wanted. The Master Chief of nukes recommended that I get out and work maintenance. The navy set me up pretty well no regrets. Next year the wife agreed that I can take 2 years off and go to school full time with my GI bill.

HawkZero
September 1st, 2008, 16:46
Well I don't regret being in from 96-2004 as a nuke. I wish I could have stuck it out for 12 more years. The bonuses are huge...especially tax free. Carrier nukes get more time off than sub nukes, bigger crew. My problem was not coming up with a job as a chief(E-7) that I liked. There was no job that I wanted. The Master Chief of nukes recommended that I get out and work maintenance. The navy set me up pretty well no regrets. Next year the wife agreed that I can take 2 years off and go to school full time with my GI bill.

Grover...check out the new GI bill benefits structure. HUGE changes. Should be available from the VA website.

markw
September 1st, 2008, 17:03
Grover...check out the new GI bill benefits structure. HUGE changes. Should be available from the VA website.


Hmm... Do they apply to those of us who originally paid in back in 87?

Wow, 12 years, you should've stuck it out, betcha looking back that the 12 years went by quick. It seems like yesterday that I first enlisted. I kind of miss it, but man, the money is so much better now for doing the same job.

The nukes I was with had the longest hours of _ANYONE_ I've ever seen work.
Like I said, 6 years of Hell, then good money on the outside.

Darky
September 2nd, 2008, 12:24
I don't regret my time. Wish things had worked out differently for me to stay in, but they didn't. Still think of going back, even as a reservist, every once in a while.