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View Full Version : how hard is a CLOCKSPRING installation?


dumbagain
July 2nd, 2006, 21:44
tps error p0123 (MIL 24) on 97 xj 4.0L automatic.
airbag light turns on once and a while.
my extended idle switch does nothing.
my horn doesn't work but when i press it the idle goes all wacky!
idle is too high in neutral and park.
tried new tps but it didn't change anything.
any suggestions?

read alot about the clockspring screwing up...

johnlv6
July 2nd, 2006, 22:03
Let me see if i can take some pictures from my FSM. It looks to me like it's not so much difficult as it is reading the instructions so you don't set the airbag off (disconnect battery) or damage anything (center steering wheel).

Edit: photobucket compressed them...if you'd like me to email them to you let me know.

kubtastic
July 3rd, 2006, 01:09
I have no suggestion on what your problems mean, but to address the clockspring replacement:

Replacing it is very straightforward IF you don't need to use a puller. Instructions I used had a steering wheel puller as a listed tool as the wheel is pressed onto a splined section by a single nut. I loosened the nut and had no trouble removing the wheel on mine. I think the position needs to be marked as well. The clockspring itself also should be in the correct orientation to allow full turning in both directions.

I've replaced the clockspring when adding cruise control and the worst is to not trigger the air bag. Disconnect battery... unbolt/unplug, replace, put back to together.

Take caution with the airbag. There's a specific orientation it is supposed to sit when you grab it and put it down, and don't grab the airbag by it's explosive pack either. When starting for the first time, don't sit in the driver's seat. Reach in, turn the ignition, and wait for the airbag light to go off. Only then should you get behind the wheel again.

RichP
July 3rd, 2006, 06:16
I have no suggestion on what your problems mean, but to address the clockspring replacement:

Replacing it is very straightforward IF you don't need to use a puller. Instructions I used had a steering wheel puller as a listed tool as the wheel is pressed onto a splined section by a single nut. I loosened the nut and had no trouble removing the wheel on mine. I think the position needs to be marked as well. The clockspring itself also should be in the correct orientation to allow full turning in both directions.

I've replaced the clockspring when adding cruise control and the worst is to not trigger the air bag. Disconnect battery... unbolt/unplug, replace, put back to together.

Take caution with the airbag. There's a specific orientation it is supposed to sit when you grab it and put it down, and don't grab the airbag by it's explosive pack either. When starting for the first time, don't sit in the driver's seat. Reach in, turn the ignition, and wait for the airbag light to go off. Only then should you get behind the wheel again.


To clarify, reach in from the passenger side or fully recline the drivers seat before turning the key, then once it starts wiggle the steering wheel a few times before raising the seat to it's full and upright locked position :D keeping your eyes tightly closed.

I did the reclined position as I have a 5 speed so the clutch pedal has to be depressed...
As for setting the air bag down, base down, airbag up, don't want the base turning into a missle if it does fire off..

dumbagain
July 3rd, 2006, 06:35
i have a FSM but i am intimidated by the airbag instructions. i am pretty good mechanically but the centering of the clockspring and some other details are holding me back.

would you let someone with little experience with airbags and a FSM change yours for you?

RichP
July 3rd, 2006, 06:51
Once you disconnect the battery and let it sit for a half hour or so the bag becomes inert and is not an issue unless you are in a very static electric environment so NO SPANDEX, silk or other static generating clothes....

The biggest one is lining up the steering wheel once it's off and you want to put it back on, use a magic marker to mark so you can line it up again. If you don't use a puller on the wheel and decide to 'pop it off' by hitting it underneath I would recommend putting a big pillow between your face and the steering wheel, either that or good dental insurance and the phone number of a good doctor that can straighten noses :D

Otherwise it's not a big deal, treat the air bag with respect and keep it clean..

dumbagain
July 3rd, 2006, 16:18
check this out...

when i push the horn while idling in park, the idle drops and stalls the xj!

i think i got a mess on my hands

scoobyxj
July 4th, 2006, 04:29
The high idle in neutral, and park is the high idle switch doing it's thing. With all the problems your describing I would check, clean with some contact cleaner, and put some dielectric greese on the PCM plugs as a first step before diving into other things. When you use the grease I would put in on then take the plug back off and wipe the excess off everything execpt the pins themselves.
There also some grounds by the PCM I would clean, and behind the dash on the drivers side look to left of the stearing wheel.

Frank Z
July 4th, 2006, 05:42
Let's take a bit of the mystery out of the airbag removal. There are hundreds of Jeep dealer service centers around the country where mechanics are doing this job on a daily basis. It's not rocket science, but it can be dangerous IF you don't take a few basic precautions. I'm sure that someone, somewhere has been injured from doing the job wrong, but I've yet to see a story on the local or national news about it. I've yet to see a link posted that shows the bloody aftermath...the hundreds of dead nuns and orphans....well you get the picture. Hell even crossing the street is dangerous, that's why we're taught at a young age to look both ways first.

To answer your original question....very easy. I just replaced mine last friday before our camping trip.

Make sure your front tires are pointing straight ahead.

Disconnect the battery for a few minutes before getting started....and yes you leave it disconnected.

After removing the air bag, steering wheel, and the loosening the upper plastic cover you simply pull the old part out. There are a couple of plastic retainers that hold the part in place, so you may have to give it a good tug. After it's out you'll need to disconnect the two electrical connectors on the back side of the clockspring.

When installing the new part, the steps are in reverse order. The new clockspring will have a small piece of plastic sticking out at the 12 o'clock position, it's there to keep everything lined up while your performing the installation. Make sure you yank it out before putting the steering wheel back on. Re-install the steering wheel and make sure you don't pinch the wires behind the wheel. Reconnect the wires to the airbag and re-install the airbag onto the steering wheel. Reconnect the battery and start it up.

dumbagain...check you PM Inbox. I sent ya a little present.

RAVC1
July 4th, 2006, 07:12
I installed this as part of installing a cruise control kit (from the dealer) in my '97 XJ Sport. I followed the instruction sheet that accompanied the kit and worked cautiously.

I had no trouble with this performing this work.

Note on the 1997 I did not have to connect the scan tool after the cruise control kit was installed as is required on some model year XJs. I do not remember if this the scan tool check is for the airbag or the cruise system controls. My guess is this was necessary for the airbag check as it is disconnected as part of this procedure.

Rick