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blackbat21
July 1st, 2006, 08:27
Last summer I had the evaporator changed out on my 97.

For 3 weeks I was having artic breezes, then with no change big change in the outside temperature it started only blowing at 60.

I took it back to the place that did the work; they said I need a new hose. Being it was at the end of summer, I waited till this year to replace.
Now I take the new hose to be installed (at a different place) and they are saying I donít need a hose and I donít have a leek. High side pressure is OK & Low side pressure OK.

But I still only have 60 degree air coming out of my vents.

langer1
July 1st, 2006, 09:37
The air from your vents should never be more them 20 deg's below outside temp. If you also converted to 134a it will be closer to 10 deg's

red91
July 1st, 2006, 10:42
if you have 60 degree air coming out of your vents...give me your jeep.


I'd be grateful....

90Pioneer
July 1st, 2006, 12:29
The air from your vents should never be more them 20 deg's below outside temp. If you also converted to 134a it will be closer to 10 deg's


You sure about that? My 91 bmw 318is will blow about 40 (37* to be exact) degrees when it's 85 out. I would also venture a guess that the AC in my jeep blows more than 20 degrees cooler than outside temp.

If it's 100 out, doesnt do a lot of good having 80 degree air being blown at you.

blackbat21
July 1st, 2006, 12:44
After the evaporator was replaced it the air was coming out of the vents at around 40 degrees with the outside temp around 90.

3 weeks later; outside temp still around 90 degrees air was coming out of the vents at around 60 degrees.

Fred85
July 1st, 2006, 13:35
doesn't the fsm state that the correct temp. of the air coming out of the vents from a properly functioning ac system be in the low or mid 40 degree range?

majic_tech
July 1st, 2006, 17:38
The air from your vents should never be more them 20 deg's below outside temp. If you also converted to 134a it will be closer to 10 deg's
WRONG!

XJ6
July 1st, 2006, 18:04
The air directly out of your vents should be in the low 40s, also there are times when the pressures read normal but the system charge is low. The first shop said a hose was leaking, I'd want to know the amount of R12 (or R134a) in your system by evacuating it - if low it could be the hose you already have, replace it then recharge with test dye added to see if there are any other leaks (also will show if leaks later develop), if the system charge is not low then of course other tests will need to be run on the system. Hope this helps.

Mike

YMMV
July 1st, 2006, 19:46
The air directly out of your vents should be in the low 40s, also there are times when the pressures read normal but the system charge is low. The first shop said a hose was leaking, I'd want to know the amount of R12 (or R134a) in your system by evacuating it - if low it could be the hose you already have, replace it then recharge with test dye added to see if there are any other leaks (also will show if leaks later develop), if the system charge is not low then of course other tests will need to be run on the system. Hope this helps.

Mike

Exactly. They should have dye the system after the repair and recharge.

lawsoncl
July 6th, 2006, 20:50
doesn't the fsm state that the correct temp. of the air coming out of the vents from a properly functioning ac system be in the low or mid 40 degree range?


Yup, it says about 40 degrees cooler than ambient temp. You might want to check and make sure the air mixture/blend door is working properly.

langer1
July 7th, 2006, 05:43
WRONG!
I was wrong, it 20 deg below the air going in to the evap not the outside air.

Saudade
July 7th, 2006, 09:08
According to the 2000 FSM (close as I can get it), at 90 deg ambient air temp, the conditioned air should exit the center panel outlet at 37-48 deg. A good set of gauges are needed to really measure the charge in the system. You still could be low. You might also have a blend door problem.

Oatmeal
July 8th, 2006, 14:05
A 15-20 degree temperature drop between the air entering the evaporator core (return air) and what's exiting the dash vents (supply) is average, it'll get colder as the interior temperature drops (to a point). So, if it's say, 100 degrees inside your Jeep the air coming out of your vents won't be any cooler than 80 degrees (at first) until the interior temperature drops then, the outgoing air will continue to drop in temperature. If after a good while it still, never gets below the 60 degrees you mentioned then, you might have a bad expansion valve. Also, if your system was an R12 system retrofitted to R134a it won't cool as well as it would with R12. R134a isn't as efficient R12 and would require a larger evaporator and condenser to move the same amount of heat. This stuff: http://www.sherco-auto.com/fr4012.htm however, is an excellent replacement for R12 and blows nearly as cold. I run it in my Toyota and my girlfriend's Acura------Hans

Blaine B.
December 3rd, 2006, 14:19
Most people don't set their houses much below 78 degrees in the summer. Tell me it isn't cold to walk in when its 95 outside????