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IntrepidBear
November 29th, 2017, 09:42
I have been lurking on the forums absorbing the collective wisdom on the forum.

I have a 89 Renix era XJ 4.0 engine, AW4 Transmission, D30 front w/ disconnect axle, and Dana 35 rear. 141000 miles.

The vehicle has a ton of sentimental value to me and I have started the process of getting her back on the road. She has been in storage for 15 years, I parked her when the Ignition Control Module went bad, and I didn't have time to sort it out.

About a year ago I went through the basics, replaced the fuel pump, filter, injectors, and all associated o-rings, fuel pressure regulator. Plugs, cap, rotor. and battery. I did the brakes, front and rear. Put new tires on it, and replaced hoses, serpentine, air filter etc. I had a little trouble getting a spark, but eventually tracked it down to a bad connection between the coil and the new ICM. Low and behold she fired up.

At idle she sounds great, and revs, without issues. In drive she lacks power it almost feels like the transmission is slipping badly. I drove her a mile or two but she barely made it up an small hill outside the house. Right before I parked her she was driving fine.

Questions: Any suggestion as to what could be causing the severe lack of power/slipping?

Has anyone else had these types of symptoms after storing their vehicle?

Can transmission go bad simply with storage?

Any other service items that I should be concerned about?

Thanks guys.

blakews2217
November 29th, 2017, 10:28
I have been lurking on the forums absorbing the collective wisdom on the forum.



I have a 89 Renix era XJ 4.0 engine, AW4 Transmission, D30 front w/ disconnect axle, and Dana 35 rear. 141000 miles.



The vehicle has a ton of sentimental value to me and I have started the process of getting her back on the road. She has been in storage for 15 years, I parked her when the Ignition Control Module went bad, and I didn't have time to sort it out.



About a year ago I went through the basics, replaced the fuel pump, filter, injectors, and all associated o-rings, fuel pressure regulator. Plugs, cap, rotor. and battery. I did the brakes, front and rear. Put new tires on it, and replaced hoses, serpentine, air filter etc. I had a little trouble getting a spark, but eventually tracked it down to a bad connection between the coil and the new ICM. Low and behold she fired up.



At idle she sounds great, and revs, without issues. In drive she lacks power it almost feels like the transmission is slipping badly. I drove her a mile or two but she barely made it up an small hill outside the house. Right before I parked her she was driving fine.



Questions: Any suggestion as to what could be causing the severe lack of power/slipping?



Has anyone else had these types of symptoms after storing their vehicle?



Can transmission go bad simply with storage?



Any other service items that I should be concerned about?



Thanks guys.



Checked the fluid in the trans? Does it rev and not move as it should ( rpms rise while it does not equate to movement. )


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IntrepidBear
November 29th, 2017, 10:50
The transmission does engage, but as the revs keep rising the forward movement does not translate to much power to the wheels.

I checked the fluid cold, and its a little low. Next I was planning to drop the pan, change the filter and give it some fresh fluid.

cruiser54
November 30th, 2017, 05:07
Try this:

Put the shifter in 1-2 and see if it takes off normally.

This could be as simple as a bad connection in the trans plugs under the hood, a dirty fuse at the transmission control unit, or bad tCU,

Afireinside
December 1st, 2017, 07:03
Check the trans fluid hot and in park or neutral. It should be way over full when cold. I bet some fluid leaked over the past 15 years lol.
Good luck

Ecomike
December 1st, 2017, 13:38
141,000 miles on a 89 is way too many miles, time to junk it, I'd be happy to help you out and take it off your hands.

:laugh2:

Afireinside and cruiser54 made good suggestions.

The Tranny fluid can go very bad after 15 years (it can oxidize, it use to be made from refined peanut oil). I would drain 3 quarts from the drain plug, and refile with only DEX III, nothing else, 3-4 times, run it in each gear and neutral and park, all at 0 mph, to let it circulate for about 10 minutes. Make sure the fluid gets hot!!! Do not try to drive it yet.

Then drain it and refill. After 4 times (the AW4 and TC holds about 10 quarts) add a pint of Trans-x to help dissolve any baked on varnish in the valves and to re-swell the o'ring seals on the shafts and valve body spools. It is not a good idea to drain it all once, not is easy to do. It is best give it 4 transfusions, and slowly clean it up. I would change the filter after the 3rd transfusion.

Get it circulating and hot, with out driving it and then test drive it again. But before you test drive it, make sure the TCU has power and test the solenoids and wiring, clean the wiring harness connector going the transmission with electric/plastic safe solvent.

Do the first test drive manually in 1-2, then 3, then D to see if shifts and if it has power.

Also make sure the Transmission pressure cable at the throttle body has been adjusted properly!!! There is a huge thread, and you tube video on that. Takes about 60 seconds to do. It controls the Tranny pump pressure internally...

You want to get clean fluid in there, get it circulating with some Trans-X to clean up and re-wet those clutch plates in the Tranny with clean fluid and in the TC (Torque Converter) before you try to drive it again!!

Also, in the process drop the pan and clean it and change to filter.

You have an 80% chance imho of the transmission coming out OK.

You may see a tiny bit of haft seal leaks at the engine RMS and the transmission front and rear seals after 15 years of the shafts laying on the bottom of the seal areas. With some oil, RMS sealer additive and Trans-x additives for the Tranny those seals may fix themselves over several 1000 miles of DD operation.

88trailcrawler
December 1st, 2017, 22:49
All good suggestion above from people WAY more qualified than me. However I will add based on my experiences.

Unplug the TCU fuse (under the glove box). If you can manually shift through the gears should eliminate internal transmission problems.

Research how to test your TPS as one side communicates with the transmission.

And finally, I do whole heartedly agree that an 1989 XJ with 141k miles coming out of 15 years storage just sounds like an awfull train wreck. Let me know your location and I’ll gladly come discard if it for you.

Saudade
December 2nd, 2017, 09:32
Welcome back!! My '88 has 202,000 miles and is my daily driver.

Was it stored indoors?

In addition to the other suggestions, I think I'd pull the seats and carpets to check the floors. Also have a peek inside the exhaust. The smaller critters may have made nests, chewed wiring, stole seat foam.

Did you measure your fuel pressure?

Afireinside
December 3rd, 2017, 14:36
Please don't try and drive it until you verify the atf level! You will kill a possibly good trans if you try!
Good luck

IntrepidBear
December 10th, 2017, 10:16
Thanks for all the great responses guys! Very much appreciate it.

I haven't had a chance to work on it recently, work hijacked my schedule for the last few weeks.

Great tips on the transmission, I ill take your advise and flush it with TransX. I am hopeful that it is a low/bad fluid, and that it will remedy itself with a proper service and pan filter drop.

Does anyone have the link to the video on how to adjust the transmission pressure cable? I can google it, but it's not something that I have done before.

I should be able to dig into it over the holidays once work cools down a bit.

I'll check under the carpet, but I'm hopeful that the rust shouldn't be too bad. It has lived in Southern California until I parked it back in 2002. It was stored in the humid tropics, but indoors.

Ecomike
December 10th, 2017, 10:59
Unless it has been exposed to salt, beach or salted roads, the 87-90 jeeps do not rust. But not having a good battery connected them, does seem to encourage rust every where.

cruiser54
December 10th, 2017, 11:25
Here's the link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0di1z5j1fU

BALTANAKT
December 10th, 2017, 15:22
Man, I love the old early model XJ's. Happy to see one being revived.

IntrepidBear
January 6th, 2018, 17:28
So I had a chance to do spend some time on it over the past weeks. It turns out that the fuse for the transmission controller was very corroded and was likely causing the transmission problem. I am not 100% sure about this because not long after starting it up,
I started getting a nasty noise from the engine.

To make a long story short, after tearing the valve cover off, I discovered bent push rods. A little more investigation I found the cause of the problem: stuck inlet valves. I believe that what happened was that the old fuel residue mixed with the new gas, and the solids in the fuel caused the inlet valves to stick so badly that it bent some push rods.

Soooooooooo: now I have the head off, valves out, and am about to take the head to have it cleaned. I have cleaned up the valves, and am waiting for new push rods and head gasket to arrive.

I have also dropped the tank again and am cleaning with solvents, and will flush the line this time........definitely don't want to do this job twice.

Has anyone else had this happen?

With a bit of luck I will know whether the transmission issue is fixed in a week or so after parts get here.

IntrepidBear
January 6th, 2018, 17:32
One more question: I was planning to reuse the valve stem seals. They feel supple, and I haven't been able to locate a local source for new ones.

Has anyone done this? Did it cause any problems?

Thanks!

Ecomike
January 6th, 2018, 17:46
I have never had or seen a bent push rod in person.

I would replace the valve seals. They should be in / come with, the head gasket kit, along with the the intake-exhaust gasket and a thermostat gasket.

IntrepidBear
January 6th, 2018, 18:20
Yeah, neither had I until now. I had 4 bent push rods all on the inlet valves. Valves were stuck so badly that I had to tap them out with a punch. Exhaust valves were all fine.

On inspection, they were caked in black tar like stuff on the top surface and stem, this was the glue binding them up. Paint thinners dissolved the black stuff pretty easily, and I was able to get them cleaned up.

I dropped the tank today, and found more black stuff in the tank. I rinsed it out with lacquer thinners twice and then with water and detergent probably 20 times, until I didn't get any more sediment. Rinsed twice with 100% ethanol to absorb the water. In the morning I'll finish the process with a gasoline rinse and line flush......what a pain in the behind.

Thanks for the tip on the valve seals. I checked, and you are correct that the set I ordered comes with them. Now I just have to wait for it to get here.

Ecomike
January 7th, 2018, 10:05
What kind of fuel are you using down there?

Even the 10% ethanol gas here in the US over time dissolves the old rubber used in the fuel pump assy parts and fuel hoses!!!!

Now they use a better material, mostly viton....

This what mine looked like, and the black goo was all over the inside guts of the fuel tank, so I replaced mine. It was like tar. The rubber they used back 30 years ago was not meant for ethanol. Found the hoses on my diesel in the same mess last year, tanks to the biodiesel additive. They were like chewing gum. It's all Viton ID tube now.

http://www.naxja.org/forum/picture.php?albumid=353&pictureid=3877

Ecomike
January 7th, 2018, 10:11
Adding acetone, or MEK or equal as a fuel additive could carry all that crap into the intake manifold!!!! Or using a bunch of seafoam in the intake manifold if it dissolved and dumped all that crap on the intake valves just before turning the car of for months could do that.

Thanks for sharing, never knew that was possible to bend the push rods just from that kind of muck.

If I were you I would replace the fuel pump and level sensors assy, and fuel pressure regulator on the fuel rail and at least flush the injectors since that crap had to get into the guts of those.

What does the intake manifold interior look like???? Could it still have a bunch of that carp ready to do it again?

lawagoneer
January 7th, 2018, 19:38
I didn't bend any valves in my 89 when I revived it but I killed a fuel pump with crap sitting in the tank by not pulling it and cleaning it. Thought it was going to be a pain but it was really easy. I have the tank skid plate and trailer hitch that I had to drop. Then dropped the tank emptied the remaining gas/crap that I could the cleaned it out with acetone. Once dried I reinstalled the fuel pump and put it with the hitch and skid back in. The whole process took me about 2 hours working easy.

Ecomike
January 8th, 2018, 07:36
2 Hours? Braggart, LOL. Took me 2 months :shhh:.

Most of that was procrastinating, shopping and waiting on parts, tried to fix it the easy way, LOL. Did not know about the crud in the tank till we dropped it and pulled the pump and found what a mess it looked like, then looked in the tank and freaked out. Tried for ages to get the cover off the tank and the pump out with out dropping it. Damn near could not get off with the tank removed. Had to cut the mounting straps and bolts off and replace them. I Replaced every thing, nothing got reused. So far the fuel lines, and FPR and injectors are OK on that rig.

I didn't bend any valves in my 89 when I revived it but I killed a fuel pump with crap sitting in the tank by not pulling it and cleaning it. Thought it was going to be a pain but it was really easy. I have the tank skid plate and trailer hitch that I had to drop. Then dropped the tank emptied the remaining gas/crap that I could the cleaned it out with acetone. Once dried I reinstalled the fuel pump and put it with the hitch and skid back in. The whole process took me about 2 hours working easy.

lawagoneer
January 8th, 2018, 07:58
I found the crud in my tank after replacing the fuel pump without dropping it. Worked for about 3 minutes before dying. Got another new pump, had already replaced the filter and necessary fuel lines with the first pump. Point to think about it was quicker and easier to replace the pump with the tank out than in the vehicle, for me at least. When I dropped it I know what I was going to do. My XJ is almost rust free as well, that makes a big difference.

Ecomike
January 8th, 2018, 08:12
I did not want to drop the tank, and I was partly right about not wanting to as the mounting nuts would not come off of the bolts (bolts were bent I think, or threads damaged, it was not rust), had to cut the bolts and one strap. Then I had to go find replacements, vent valves, hoses, level sensor and the tube assy and wiring (already had 3 new Bosch pumps in my stash), gas tank, bolts and straps....

Once we got the tank open, I decided to just replace it (found one dirt cheap delivered on Amazon prime for something crazy like $70)?

But after about 6 attempts at getting a tool to fit the flange-seal, and then getting cruizer54 to make me a tool to force the cover ring off, I had to give up and drop the tank anyway.

I found the crud in my tank after replacing the fuel pump without dropping it. Worked for about 3 minutes before dying. Got another new pump, had already replaced the filter and necessary fuel lines with the first pump. Point to think about it was quicker and easier to replace the pump with the tank out than in the vehicle, for me at least. When I dropped it I know what I was going to do. My XJ is almost rust free as well, that makes a big difference.

IntrepidBear
January 15th, 2018, 03:19
Guys, I just wanted to post an update.....the jeep finally drives!! AND I think it shifts properly.

The fuel residue was really nasty stuff. Not only did the tank get a good cleaning, I also had to scrape the residue from the inlet ports on the block, and the inlet manifold. Thanks for the tip Ecomike! The hot bath/clean did not remove the deposits. I had to go through each port with a small pick and solvents to get it all out. Had to flush the fuel line, soaked and flushed the injectors.

Put it all back together, and cleaned all the grounds, and turned the key, and it runs! The engine sounds healthy, now I have a minor coolant leak to resolve and I should be able to take it for a proper road test. Man what a pain in the butt this job has turned out to be.

Thanks for all the help/advise.

Ecomike
January 15th, 2018, 11:50
How did you get it out of the guts of the intake manifold?

Acetone should have worked well. But dries very fast. Hard to work with. Aircraft paint stripper might have been the best to use.

Congrats on the reviving.

IntrepidBear
January 18th, 2018, 04:19
I used a mixture of gasoline and lacquer thinner with a small stiff brush and a pick. It took ages. Thinner cut the solids better then gasoline, but evaporated too fast to work with, so I alternated between gasoline and thinners.

Unrelated question: the barn where I stored it had fruit bats living in it. It appears that the droppings have etched the windshield pretty badly. I have never run into this before, but I am trying to get the marks off with little success so far. Any ideas on what to try? I have cleaned, washed, used detergent, used very fine steel wool, razor blade all to no avail.

Ecomike
January 18th, 2018, 20:09
Try a solvent based, paste style paint stripper? But it sounds like the acid in the bat droppings etched the glass.

cruiser54
January 18th, 2018, 20:46
Get a new windshield. This thread is driving me batshit.