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Glenn B
October 9th, 2006, 12:40
Just for fun, post some of the fun stuff about where you live:
See www.wikipedia.com (http://www.wikipedia.com) then search for your place. List what they have under "Trivia".

Hoboken is the site of the first brewery in the United States, Castle Point (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castle_Point_%28Hoboken%29).
The site of the first known baseball game between two different teams, which took place at Elysian Fields, on Hudson Street between 10th and 11th Streets, where a commerative plaque and street paving are located.
The site of the first demonstration of a steam locomotive (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locomotive) in the United States at 56 Newark Street at Hudson Street.
The first departure of an electrified train, driven by Thomas A. Edison (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_A._Edison) from Hoboken Terminal to Montclair (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montclair%2C_New_Jersey).
The first central air-conditioning unit was installed at Hoboken Terminal.
The first wireless phone was used in Hoboken Terminal.
The site of a World War I embarkation point, 1st and 2nd Streets at River Street—almost all American troops sent to Europe left from here.
The home of the accidental invention of soft ice-cream, at 726 Washington Street.
Home to the first Blimpie (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blimpie) restaurant, opened in 1964. Originally located on Sixth and Washington Street, before relocating a year later two doors down to the corner of Seventh and Washington, then, in the mid-1990s, to First and Washington. A free goldfish in a colored bowl of water was given to all customers who purchased a Blimpie during the first week open.
Hoboken limits by law the number of liquor licences to the number of blocks and the limit is usually reached. Additionally, no license can be moved to within 200 feet of another bar or 500 feet from a church, which makes it nearly impossible to open a new bar (except in newly renovated perimeter regions of the city).
There is an average of one church for every block.
Hoboken has had 36 mayors since 1855 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Hoboken_Mayors).
The title characters in the 2004 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_in_film) film Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harold_and_Kumar_Go_to_White_Castle) hailed from Hoboken. This could possibly be due to director Danny Leiner (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danny_Leiner)'s own pre-Hollywood life spent here, as his earlier blockbuster film, Dude, Where's My Car? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dude%2C_Where%27s_My_Car%3F), also included a reference to the city (an alien character swears to banish another alien menace to Hoboken, New Jersey).
On the animated series Megas XLR (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megas_XLR), which is set in New Jersey, in the episode "All I Wanted Was A Slushie", after Coop bemoans the fact that his city is now devoid of slushie machines, and an alien robot is poised to wipe the town off the map as well, Jamie suggests that they go to Hoboken to find a Mega Slush machine, which Coop summarily dismisses by saying "Yeah, but...that's Hoboken."
A post-apocalyptic Hoboken is the setting of the offbeat computer RPG The Superhero League of Hoboken (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=The_Superhero_League_of_Hoboken&action=edit), by Legend Entertainment (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legend_Entertainment).
Hoboken is a well known as a railroad town. The term "hobo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hobo)" (i.e., a railroad journeyman) is incorrectly believed to have stemmed from the groups of hobos travelling from Hoboken. (See below.)
Hoboken has 48 streets.
In the 1950 Bugs Bunny (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bugs_Bunny) cartoon 8 Ball Bunny (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/8_Ball_Bunny), the performing penguin reveals he needs to go to Hoboken, after Bugs slaved the entire episode to get him to the South Pole (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Pole).
Hoboken's name is actually derived from the Hobocan Hacking Indian tribe that lived here, not traveling hobos as often told.
Hoboken High School student Siglinda Sanchez became the first Puerto Rican Capitol Page in Washington DC in 1973-74 during her High School Senior year. She served as House Speaker Carl Albert (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_Albert)'s personal page that summer. She was featured on What's My Line? (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/What%27s_My_Line%3F) and Jeopardy! (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeopardy%21) game shows as well as a featured story on "Josie and the Pussycats" "In the News"
Creators of the Broadway Musical Hair (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hair_%28play%29) James Rado and Jerome Ragne lived in Hoboken at 64 10th st. in 1968 when they wrote the play and its classic songs such as "Aquarius/Let the Sunshine", "Hair" and "How Can I be Sure" to name a few.
Hoboken was once known as the city with "a bar on every corner" and in fact was once listed in Guinness Book of Records (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guinness_Book_of_Records) as the city with "Most bars in a square mile". There were well over 200 bars in town in the first half of the 20th century. There are still well over 100 now.
Hoboken is home to Maxwells (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwells) rock club. Once dubbed New York's best rock club, even though it's in Hoboken. The first to bring prominence to the venue were The Bongos (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bongos), who were based in Hoboken, signed to RCA Records (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RCA_Records) and gained national recognition. Springsteen's "Glory Days" video was shot there.
The now-defunct band, Operation Ivy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Ivy_%28band%29) penned and recorded the song "Hoboken" about this town.
Frank Sinatra (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Sinatra) was born and raised in Hoboken. The Hoboken Public Library has so many of his CDs that they count him as a separate genre.
Hoboken is located on the West bank of the Hudson river.
The film Lianna (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lianna) by John Sayles was shot in Hoboken in 1983.
Scottish band Franz Ferdinand named a remake of their song 'Jacqueline' as 'Better in Hoboken'[edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hoboken%2C_New_Jersey&action=edit&section=20)]

Noteworthy Residents

Note: These individuals were born in Hoboken, lived there for a considerable time, or did something notable while living there even if the time was brief. (B) denotes Born in Hoboken.
Bob Borden (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Bob_Borden&action=edit), Staffer and frequent contributer on the Late Show with David Letterman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Late_Show_with_David_Letterman).
Andre Walker Brewster (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Andre_Walker_Brewster&action=edit), Major General U.S. Army, recipient Medal of Honor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medal_of_Honor) (B)
Alexander Calder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Calder), leading 20th century sculptor and artist.
Michael Chang (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Chang), professional tennis player. (B)
Jon Corzine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jon_Corzine), Governor of New Jersey (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Governor_of_New_Jersey).
Mitch Fatel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitch_Fatel), stand-up comedian and former Howard Stern (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Howard_Stern) intern.
Sandy Flitterman-Lewis (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Sandy_Flitterman-Lewis&action=edit) professor, author of To Desire Differently (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=To_Desire_Differently&action=edit).
Stephen Foster (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Foster), master 19th century songwriter.
Tony Goldwyn (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Goldwyn), actor.
Hetty Green (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hetty_Green), (in)famous business woman.
Charles J. Guiteau (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_J._Guiteau), assassin of President James Garfield (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Garfield).
Michael Jerrick (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Michael_Jerrick&action=edit), Host of the morning television series (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Television_series) Fox & Friends (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fox_%26_Friends).
Freedy Johnston (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedy_Johnston), singer-songwriter.
Alfred Kinsey (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Kinsey), famous psychologist who studied sexual behavior. (B)
Alfred Kroeber (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Kroeber), prominent 20th century anthropologist. (B)
Artie Lange (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artie_Lange), comedic actor, alum of MADtv (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MADtv) and regular on the Howard Stern (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Howard_Stern) Show.
Dorothea Lange (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothea_Lange), prominent portrait photographer. (B)
Caroline Leavitt (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caroline_Leavitt), author.
Joel Lewis (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Joel_Lewis&action=edit) poet, author
Mark Leyner (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Leyner), postmodern author.
G. Gordon Liddy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G._Gordon_Liddy), Watergate (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watergate) conspirator and radio talk show (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk_show) host. (B)
Janet Lupo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janet_Lupo), Playboy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Playboy) Playmate (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Playmate) for November 1975. (B)
Eli Manning (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eli_Manning), New York Giants (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Giants) first-string quarterback.
Jesse Palmer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesse_Palmer), former professional football player, former star of the TV show The Bachelor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bachelor).
Joe Pantoliano (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Pantoliano), actor. (B)
Maria Pepe (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maria_Pepe), first girl to play Little League (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_League) baseball. (B)
Tom Pelphrey (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Pelphrey) won an Emmy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emmy) for his role on Guiding Light (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guiding_Light).
Daniel Pinkwater (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Pinkwater), National Public Radio (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Public_Radio) commentator and author.
Anna Quindlen (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_Quindlen) columnist, novelist
John Sayles (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Sayles), filmmaker and author.
Jeremy Shockey (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeremy_Shockey), NY Giants football player.
Frank Sinatra (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Sinatra), singer and actor. He was born at 415 Monroe Street. (B)
Alfred Stieglitz (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Stieglitz) [1] (http://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/database/stieglitz_a.html), leading figure of 19th and early 20th Century American photography. (B)
Jeff Tamarkin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Tamarkin), music journalist and editor.
Kanye West (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanye_West), hip hop artist and producer.
Yo La Tengo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yo_La_Tengo), art-rock band.
Thursday (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thursday_%28band%29), Band
Two Night Stand (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Two_Night_Stand_%28band%29&action=edit), Band
Pia Zadora (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pia_Zadora), singer and actress.(B)
Mark Guiliana (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Mark_Guiliana&action=edit), drummer.[edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hoboken%2C_New_Jersey&action=edit&section=21)]

Local attractions

Stevens Institute of Technology (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stevens_Institute_of_Technology)
NJ Transit's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Jersey_Transit) Hoboken Terminal (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoboken_Terminal)
Marineview Plaza (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marineview_Plaza) Complex
North Hoboken Harbor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Hoboken_Harbor)
Castle Point (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castle_Point_%28Hoboken%29)
Sybil's Cave (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sybil%27s_Cave)
Maxwell's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maxwell%27s) Rock Club, once dubbed New York's best rock club, even though it's in Hoboken[edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hoboken%2C_New_Jersey&action=edit&section=22)]

Parks

Castle Point Park (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castle_Point_Park)
Church Square Park (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Church_Square_Park)
Columbus Park (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbus_Park)
Elysian Park (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elysian_Park)
Frank Sinatra Park (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Sinatra_Park)
Gateway Park (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gateway_Park)
Jackson Street Park (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackson_Street_Park)
Leigon Park (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Leigon_Park&action=edit)
Madison Park (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madison_Park)
Pier 14 (14th street pier) (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pier_14_%2814th_street_pier%29&action=edit)
Pier A (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pier_A)
Stevens Park (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stevens_Park)
Hudson Tea Building Walkway (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hudson_Tea_Building_Walkway&action=edit)
Hoboken Island (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoboken_Island) (to be built)
Hoboken Parks Initiative (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoboken_Parks_Initiative)

Chero-King
October 9th, 2006, 13:36
Wow, thats a lot to read....anyone wanna sum it up for me :D

Glenn B
October 9th, 2006, 13:38
Wow, thats a lot to read....anyone wanna sum it up for me :D
No, Post your own, or feel free to move on to another post that may be short enough for you to read.

Stay on topic please. :wave1:

Chero-King
October 9th, 2006, 13:45
Haha, sorry, I'm just tired this morning... heres some history from Wikipedia of my town since they didnt have "Trivia" for mine...

Between 5,000 and 10,000 years ago the Sto:lo arrived in the Chilliwack area. At the time of their first contact with Europeans it is estimated that there were as many as 30,000 people living within Sto:lo territory.

In 1857, gold was discovered in the Fraser Canyon. By 1858 over 30,000 gold miners had treked to the goldfields, most travelling through the Chilliwack area. By the mid 1860's several farms had grown up around the steamboat landings on the Fraser River called Miller's Landing, Sumas Landing and Chilliwack Landing.

The Township of Chilliwhack was incorporated in 1873, the third municipality in British Columbia. Initial settlement was along the Fraser River at Chilliwack Landing. Steamboats were the main mode of transportation, carrying goods and passengers between Chilliwack and New Westminster..

With little room for expansion along the river, the commercial area of the town moved south to the junction of the New Westminster-Yale Wagon Road, Wellington Avenue and Young Road, called "Five Corners." A large subdivision called Centreville was built In 1881. The name Centreville was replaced In 1887 by the more popular "Chilliwhack." The area was incorporated in 1908 as a separate municipality, the City of Chilliwack. The City and the Township co-existed for 72 years. In 1980 they merged to form the District of Chilliwack. The District of Chilliwack became the City of Chilliwack in the early 1990s.

The spelling of Chilliwack is sometimes a matter of confusion. Prior to the amalgamation of the City of Chilliwack and the Municipality of Chilliwhack, there were two different spellings. Upon amalgamation, the spelling of the City was used.[1]. Archaic spellings include Chilliwhyeuk and other versions closer to the original Halkomelem, the language of the Sto:lo communities around Chilliwack and Sardis.

Glenn B
October 9th, 2006, 14:06
Chiliwack. Too funny. :) I first heard of that place in a song by Diesel. Going to pull that up and give another listen. Good info though, thanks.

Edit: wrong group and song.... looking for what I meant now. LOL

TRNDRVR
October 9th, 2006, 14:15
Ogden UT.Ogden-Hinckley Airport, Utah's busiest municipal airport, is located just to the southwest of the city.Figures!

I'm not posting anymore. :doh:

Glenn B
October 9th, 2006, 14:18
Chlilliwhack did:
http://www.naxja.org/forum/../../mmrweb/img/artisthist1b.jpg (http://www.naxja.org/forum/ArtistSongHistory.asp?Artist=CHILLIWACK)
Watcha Gonna Do
My Girl (Gone, Gone, Gone)

The rest I do not recall.

Glenn B
October 9th, 2006, 14:24
Ogden UT.Figures!

I'm not posting anymore. :doh:

Dan, It is not ALL doom and gloom... other than religion and moonscape. :) Than and Mark does not ever dare to try to live there:

Demographics

As of the census (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Census)GR2 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Geographic_references#2) of 2000, there were 77,226 people, 27,384 households, and 18,402 families residing in the city. The population density (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Population_density) was 1,119.3/km² (2,899.2/mi²). There were 29,763 housing units at an average density of 431.4/km² (1,117.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 79.01% White (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_%28U.S._Census%29), 2.31% African American (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_American_%28U.S._Census%29), 1.20% Native American (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_%28U.S._Census%29), 1.43% Asian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asian_%28U.S._Census%29), 0.17% Pacific Islander (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Islander_%28U.S._Census%29), 12.95% from other races (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Race_%28United_States_Census%29), and 2.93% from two or more races. Hispanic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hispanic_%28U.S._Census%29) or Latino (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latino_%28U.S._Census%29) of any race were 23.64% of the population.
There were 27,384 households out of which 35.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.4% were married couples (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marriage) living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.8% were non-families. 26.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.32.
In the city the population was spread out with 28.8% under the age of 18, 14.6% from 18 to 24, 29.0% from 25 to 44, 16.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29 years. For every 100 females there were 102.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.5 males.
The median income for a household in the city was $34,047, and the median income for a family was $38,950. Males had a median income of $29,006 versus $22,132 for females. The per capita income (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Per_capita_income) for the city was $16,632. About 12.6% of families and 16.5% of the population were below the poverty line (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poverty_line), including 20.2% of those under age 18 and 9.3% of those age 65 or over.
[edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ogden%2C_Utah&action=edit&section=4)]

Transportation

Both Interstate 15 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstate_15) and Interstate 84 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstate_84_%28west%29) serve Ogden, connecting the city with communities far to the northwest, such as Boise, Idaho (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boise%2C_Idaho) and also points west in Oregon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oregon), and communities to the north, including Pocatello (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pocatello%2C_Idaho) and Idaho Falls, Idaho (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idaho_Falls%2C_Idaho) and Butte, Montana (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butte%2C_Montana). South on I-15 is the extended Wasatch Front metropolitan area, including the cities of Layton (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Layton%2C_Utah), Farmington (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Farmington%2C_Utah), Salt Lake City (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt_Lake_City%2C_Utah), West Jordan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Jordan%2C_Utah), Sandy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy%2C_Utah), Orem (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orem%2C_Utah), and Provo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provo%2C_Utah).
Ogden's 12th Street corridor was a subject of early planning investigations in the 1970s, as the Utah State Highway Department attempted to upgrade that facility taking into account the constraints of the urban corridor. This corridor contains a dense accumulation of lodging, public buildings, offices, restaurants and other services.
[edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ogden%2C_Utah&action=edit&section=5)]

Sites of interest


Peery's Egyptian Theatre (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peery%27s_Egyptian_Theatre)
Ogden Forest Service Building (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Forestry_Building_%28Ogden%2C_Utah%29)
Ogden Utah Temple (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ogden_Utah_Temple)
Ogden High School (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ogden_High_School)
Dee Events Center (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dee_Events_Center)
Eccles Avenue Historic District (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eccles_Avenue_Historic_District)
Bigelow-Ben Lomond Hotel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bigelow-Ben_Lomond_Hotel)
Union Station (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Union_Station_Ogden%2C_Utah)
Ogden/Weber Municipal Building (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ogden/Weber_Municipal_Building&action=edit)
Snowbasin Ski Area (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snowbasin) Alpine Skiing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpine_Skiing) venue during the 2002 Winter Olympics (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2002_Winter_Olympics)
The Ice Sheet (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=The_Ice_Sheet_Ogden%2C_Utah&action=edit) Curling (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curling) venue during the 2002 Winter Olympics [edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ogden%2C_Utah&action=edit&section=6)]

Renown

Two ships in the United States Navy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Navy) have been named after the City of Ogden. The first, USS Ogden (PF-39) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Ogden_%28PF-39%29), in 1943 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1943) and the second, USS Ogden (LPD-5) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Ogden_%28LPD-5%29), in 1964 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1964).
[edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ogden%2C_Utah&action=edit&section=7)]

Birthplace of


Academy Award (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academy_Awards) winning film director Hal Ashby (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hal_Ashby)
Rodney Bagley (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Rodney_Bagley&action=edit), inventor of the catalytic converter
Sculpter Solon Borglum (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solon_Borglum)
Historian Fawn M. Brodie (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fawn_M._Brodie)
Inventor John Moses Browning (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Browning) (firearms designer)
Basketball player Tom Chambers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Chambers)
Historian Bernard DeVoto (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernard_DeVoto)
Actor Byron Foulger (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byron_Foulger)
Businessman J. Willard Marriott (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Willard_Marriott)
Utah's 8th Governor Herbert B. Maw (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_B._Maw)
Basketball player Wataru Misaka (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wataru_Misaka)
Jazz Musician Red Nichols (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Nichols)
Entertainers "The Osmonds": George, Jr. (Virl) (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Virl_Osmond&action=edit), Tom (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Tom_Osmond&action=edit), Alan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Osmond), Wayne (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wayne_Osmond), Merrill (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Merrill_Osmond&action=edit), Jay (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jay_Osmond), Donny (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donny_Osmond), Marie (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Osmond)
Former United States National Security Advisor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_National_Security_Advisor) Brent Scowcroft (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brent_Scowcroft)
Game designer Ken St. Andre (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ken_St._Andre)
Utah's 15th Governor Olene S. Walker (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olene_S._Walker)
Actor Gedde Watanabe (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gedde_Watanabe)
Basketball player and coach Byron Scott (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byron_Scott)
International Playboy Mitchell L. Shaw (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Mitchell_L._Shaw&action=edit) [edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ogden%2C_Utah&action=edit&section=8)]

Filming Location of


Some episodes of Touched by an Angel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Touched_by_an_Angel).
Everwood (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Everwood) mostly filmed in downtown Ogden.
Blind Guy (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Blind_Guy&action=edit)
Drive Me Crazy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drive_Me_Crazy)
Con Air (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Con_Air)
The Sandlot (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sandlot)
Three O'Clock High (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_O%27Clock_High) was filmed in greater-Ogden, mostly at Ogden High School.
Fletch (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fletch)
Dumb and Dumber (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dumb_and_Dumber)
Documentary short King of O-Town: Joe McQueen (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_McQueen)

OT
October 9th, 2006, 14:32
Moore, Oklahoma

About:
Moore is a rapidly growing suburb in Cleveland County, Oklahoma and is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area. As of July 1, 2003, the city population was 44,987.

Blah blah blah......

The city often falls victim to tornadoes, and has been severely damaged by tornadoes on October 4, 1998 May 3, 1999, and May 8, 2003. The May 3, 1999 tornado that hit Moore was rated an F5 on the Fujita scale, and was one of the strongest and most destructive tornadoes ever recorded in history. The tornado, which occurred during the Oklahoma Tornado Outbreak, had an approximate recorded wind speed of 318 MPH, left a swath of destruction nearly 7 miles long, and killed 36 people in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area. This was the deadliest F5 tornado recorded since the Delhi, Louisiana tornado in 1971.

Blah blah blah....

Notable residents and natives:
Actors: Danny Cooksey. His Diff'rent Strokes co-star, Dana Plato died of a drug overdose in a recreational vehicle outside of her fiancé's parent's house in Moore.

Musicians and bands: Toby Keith


Demographics:
The racial makeup of the city is 84.63% White, 2.92% Black, 4.14% Native American, 1.62% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 1.75% from other races, and 4.89% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race are 5.10% of the population.


http://www.savepic.com/freepicturehosting/is.php?i=497655&img=HOME.JPG

karstic
October 9th, 2006, 15:11
No trivia link but I came up with this...

Famous People Born in Fullerton
Keith Van Horn, NBA player on the Dallas Mavericks. Formerly played for New York, New Jersey, Philadelphia, and Milwaukee.
Phil Nevin, MLB player on the Chicago Cubs. Formerly played for Texas, San Diego, Anaheim, Detroit, and Houston.
Gwen Stefani, lead singer of No Doubt and solo recording artist.
Tudor Cora, Nobel Prize winning scientist, for his discovery of the origins of cheese.
Jenna Haze, Pornographic actress, Won AVN Award Best New Starlet in 2003.
Eric Wynalda, All-time leading scorer for the U.S. Soccer National Team
Jim Edmonds, MLB player on the St. Louis Cardinals

Rev Den
October 9th, 2006, 15:15
No trivia here either, so....

The Village of Plainfield is a municipality (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Municipality) in Will County (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Will_County%2C_Illinois), Illinois (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illinois), United States (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States). The Village includes land in Plainfield and Wheatland Townships. Please note, however, that part of Plainfield is located in Kendall County (NuAuSay and Oswego Townships). The population has grown from 4,500 in 1990 to about 30,314 in 2005. [1] (http://www.dailysouthtown.com/southtown/dsnews/057abn2.htm) Plainfield is also one of the fastest growing communities in Illinois.

Plainfield is identified as the oldest community in Will County

The Plainfield Tornado (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Plainfield_Tornado), an F5 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fujita_scale) tornado, devastated the Village on August 28 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_28), 1990 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1990) killing 29 people.
Plainfield is the headquarters city of Dale Coyne Racing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dale_Coyne_Racing), a team in the Champ Car World Series (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Champ_Car_World_Series)

At one time, the two, longest paved highways in the world (Lincoln Highway and U.S. Route 66) crossed in Plainfield. The highways only crossed each other twice and both locations are in Will County.

As of the census (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Census)GR2 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Geographic_references#2) of 2000, there were 13,038 people, 4,315 households, and 3,521 families residing in the village. According to a 2003 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2003) special census, the village has a population of 20,673. The population density (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Population_density) was 433.6/km² (1,122.8/mi²). There were 4,609 housing units at an average density of 153.3/km² (396.9/mi²). The racial makeup of the village was 95.85% White (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_%28U.S._Census%29), 0.84% African American (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_American_%28U.S._Census%29), 0.08% Native American (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_%28U.S._Census%29), 1.25% Asian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asian_%28U.S._Census%29), 0.01% Pacific Islander (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Islander_%28U.S._Census%29), 1.01% from other races (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Race_%28United_States_Census%29), and 0.96% from two or more races. Hispanic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hispanic_%28U.S._Census%29) or Latino (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latino_%28U.S._Census%29) of any race were 3.87% of the population.

Rev

Glenn B
October 9th, 2006, 15:17
Damn, an F5? No thanks. I dig Champ racing. Thanks for the post.

No trivia here either, so....

The Village of Plainfield is a municipality (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Municipality) in Will County (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Will_County%2C_Illinois), Illinois (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illinois), United States (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States). The Village includes land in Plainfield and Wheatland Townships. Please note, however, that part of Plainfield is located in Kendall County (NuAuSay and Oswego Townships). The population has grown from 4,500 in 1990 to about 30,314 in 2005. [1] (http://www.dailysouthtown.com/southtown/dsnews/057abn2.htm) Plainfield is also one of the fastest growing communities in Illinois.

Plainfield is identified as the oldest community in Will County

The Plainfield Tornado (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Plainfield_Tornado), an F5 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fujita_scale) tornado, devastated the Village on August 28 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_28), 1990 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1990) killing 29 people.
Plainfield is the headquarters city of Dale Coyne Racing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dale_Coyne_Racing), a team in the Champ Car World Series (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Champ_Car_World_Series)

At one time, the two, longest paved highways in the world (Lincoln Highway and U.S. Route 66) crossed in Plainfield. The highways only crossed each other twice and both locations are in Will County.

As of the census (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Census)GR2 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Geographic_references#2) of 2000, there were 13,038 people, 4,315 households, and 3,521 families residing in the village. According to a 2003 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2003) special census, the village has a population of 20,673. The population density (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Population_density) was 433.6/km² (1,122.8/mi²). There were 4,609 housing units at an average density of 153.3/km² (396.9/mi²). The racial makeup of the village was 95.85% White (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_%28U.S._Census%29), 0.84% African American (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_American_%28U.S._Census%29), 0.08% Native American (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_%28U.S._Census%29), 1.25% Asian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asian_%28U.S._Census%29), 0.01% Pacific Islander (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Islander_%28U.S._Census%29), 1.01% from other races (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Race_%28United_States_Census%29), and 0.96% from two or more races. Hispanic (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hispanic_%28U.S._Census%29) or Latino (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latino_%28U.S._Census%29) of any race were 3.87% of the population.

Rev

Cornflake
October 9th, 2006, 15:24
here is where i live now ;

REDDING is the county seat of Shasta County, California, USA, located on the Sacramento River and on Interstate 5 south of Shasta Lake. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 80,865. A 2005 estimate reports the city's population as 88,700.

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 80,865 people, 32,103 households, and 20,995 families residing in the city. The population density was 534.3/km² (1,383.8/mi²). There were 33,802 housing units at an average density of 223.3/km² (578.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 88.70% White, 1.05% African American, 2.23% Native American, 2.95% Asian, 0.12% Pacific Islander, 1.64% from other races, and 3.32% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.43% of the population.


History, places of interest, and recent events
Situated along the Siskiyou Trail, an ancient trade and travel route connecting California's Central Valley and the Pacific Northwest, the site of Redding was occupied by Native Americans of the Wintu tribe from about the year 1000. During the early 1800s, Hudson's Bay Company trappers and members of the United States Exploring Expedition passed through the site of Redding, while traveling along the Siskyou Trail.

The first non-native settler in the area was Pierson B. Reading, an early California pioneer. Reading was admirer of John Sutter, and in 1844, Reading received a Mexican land grant for the area occupied by today's Redding and Cottonwood, California, along the Sacramento River. At the time it was (by over 100 miles) the northernmost non-native settlement in California.

Later, what was to become the town of Redding was founded by miners. Originally not a very prosperous town, it was known as Poverty Flats. Named for railroad man Benjamin B. Redding, the town was rechristened "Reading" in 1874, honoring founder Pierson B. Reading. The railroad, however, would not recognize the change, and the original Redding was restored in 1880.

During the twentieth century, Redding's main industry was lumber, but this is no longer the case. Currently, Redding's two biggest industries are the medical and legal industries.


Sundial Bridge at Turtle BayRedding has two hospitals, Mercy Medical Center (Catholic Healthcare West) and Shasta Regional Medical Center, formerly Redding Medical Center.

In 2004, the Sundial Bridge at Turtle Bay was completed. The dramatic pedestrian span was designed by noted Spanish architect-engineer-artist Santiago Calatrava and links the north and south campuses of the 200 acre (809,000 m²) Turtle Bay Exploration Park.

Redding has three public high schools, Shasta High School, Foothill High School, and Enterprise High School, as well as several middle schools, over a dozen elementary schools and several religious and other private schools. Redding also has four small colleges: Shasta College, a public two-year college, Simpson University, a four-year Christian college, Shasta Bible College and Graduate School, a private four-year Christian college and graduate school, and National University.

Redding is also important as the largest city in the northern Sacramento Valley and the largest city on the 470-mile stretch of Interstate 5 between Sacramento, California and Eugene, Oregon. Both Redding and its neighbor to the south, Red Bluff, are popular with tourists who use the cities as bases to explore Lassen Volcanic National Park, Lake Shasta, and other natural attractions.

Trivia
The town of Redding is featured in the RPG Fallout 2.

Famous people
Famous "Reddingites" include:

Professional baseball player Chris Woodward used to live in Redding.
Theater composer and actor David de Berry came from Redding.
Movie producer Kathleen Kennedy was raised in Redding.
Former NFL defensive star Jason Sehorn attended Shasta College in Redding before going on to play at USC.
Country star Merle Haggard currently lives in the Redding area
Billionaire Archie Aldis Emmerson is Redding's richest person, and is California's largest private landowner.
Former professional baseball player and current manager for the United States in the first ever World Baseball Classic scheduled for Spring 2006, Buck Martinez.
Ashley Parker Angel, Former member of the now defunct O-town, was born and raised here.



Here is where i was born and raised and spent the first 22 years of life :

MODESTO is the county seat of Stanislaus County in the U.S. state of California. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 188,856. Current census estimates place the population at 206,300. According to the California State Department of Finance 1/6/06 estimate, 514,370 people live in the Modesto Metropolitan Statistical Area. One and a half hours from Sacramento, California's capital city, and two hours from both San Jose and San Francisco, Modesto's location has turned the agriculturally based city into a bedroom community. Over twenty percent of the workforce travels outside of the county to their place of employment. The area is plagued by some of the worst air quality in the nation, on occasion surpassing even that of Los Angeles. It is also reported to have the highest car theft per capita rate in the United States for at least two years.

Modesto's climate consists of hot, dry summers, cool to mild winters, and temperate spring and fall seasons. Precipitation is greatest from November to March, a period that is also characteristic of dense fog. The all-time record high temperature is 113°F (45°C) set recently on July 23, 2006. The all-time record low temperature is 18°F (-8°C) set on December 13, 1932.

History
Modesto, originally a stop on the railroad connecting Sacramento to Los Angeles, was founded in 1870 and was to be named for William Chapman Ralston, its founder and the financier of many projects in early California. However, he declined the suggestion and a Spanish-speaking railroad worker at the naming ceremony said that Ralston was "Muy modesto" or very modest. Instead, the town was named Modesto.

Modesto's official slogan is "Water Wealth Contentment Health," which is emblazoned on a large arch uptown that has been immortalized in many photographs. A contest was run in 1911 to determine the slogan. The original winning slogan was: "Nobody's got Modesto's goat". The second place entry was the final winner.

Industry
Modesto's industries are mainly food processing and related industries; E & J Gallo Winery, Del Monte Foods, Foster Farms, Frito Lay, Blue Diamond Growers, Hershey and Con-Agra are nationally recognized food companies with large operations in the area. However, with its maturing infrastructure, the service industry is expanding.

Demographics
As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 188,856 people, 64,959 households, and 46,640 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,037.4/km² (5,277.3/mi²). There were 67,179 housing units at an average density of 724.7/km² (1,877.2/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 69.58% White, 3.97% African American, 1.24% Native American, 6.03% Asian, 0.50% Pacific Islander, 12.74% from other races, and 5.93% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 25.58% of the population.

Famous/Infamous People From Modesto
Scott Mitchell - Famous attorney known for his shrewd and agressive arguments in court
Cliff Barrows - lifelong assistant and director to Christian evangelist Billy Graham
Chidi Ahanotu - NFL defensive end
Carter Williams - K1 (kickboxing) World Champion
Gary Condit - Former Congressman
Tony Graziani - Arena Football League quarterback
George Lucas - Writer, Producer, Director (MOM WENT TO H.S. WITH HIM)
Ann Veneman - UNICEF Executive Director/Former US Secretary of Agriculture
James Marsters - Actor (Best known as "Spike" From the hit television show, Buffy The Vampire Slayer)
Chuck Hayes - NBA Basketball player
Timothy Olyphant - Actor (Deadwood, The Girl Next Door - Attended Fred C. Beyer High School)
Mark Spitz - 1972 Olympic Champion in Swimming
Kenny Roberts - Three times 500cc motorcycle world champion
Mike Allsup - Guitarist from Three Dog Night (HIS SON IS A CLOSE FRIEND OF MINE)
Sonny Barger - founding member of the original Oakland, California, chapter of Hells Angels
Harve Presnell - American Actor
Kirby J. Hensley - Founder of Universal Life Church
Carol Channing - American Broadway and Film Actress
Cyrus "Cy" Young - 1952 Olympic Champion in Javelin
Wilbur "Moose" Thompson - 1948 Olympic Champion in Shot Put
Ray Lankford - Former Major League Baseball Outfielder First 1,000 yard rusher for Modesto Junior College
Gino Marchetti - Former Defensive End for Baltimore Colts, NFL Hall of Fame Member
Jason Lytle - Lead singer and founder of the critically acclaimed band Grandaddy (USED TO PLAY BASS WITH THESE GUYS, GOOD FRIENDS)
Scott Peterson - Convicted murderer of his wife Laci Peterson, whose trial garnered national attention (I WENT TO H.S. WITH LACI)

Interesting Facts
Modesto is the setting for the movie American Graffiti created by George Lucas, who was born in the city (the actual location of the set was Petaluma, California). Many of the characters and scenes from the movie are based on actual events that happened in Modesto during the time that Lucas went to high school there.

Modesto and the greater Modesto area have recently been associated with high profile murders, including Chandra Levy (HER DAD WAS MY DOCTOR) and Laci Peterson. It was also the district of former congressman Gary Condit. Although Scott Peterson has been convicted and sentenced to die for the killing of his wife, the method of administering death in California is now in judicial suspension.

Modesto is Home to the Modesto Nuts of the High-A California League (Colorado Rockies minor league team); the Nuts play their home games at John Thurman Field. Modesto is also the home of the critically acclaimed musical group Grandaddy, the E & J Gallo Winery, and the McHenry Mansion.

The Universal Life Church headquarters are based in Modesto, California.

Cornflake
October 9th, 2006, 15:27
wherever it says Shasta on my post it puts a dude beating a horse. Cool......

Cornflake
October 9th, 2006, 15:27
okay lets try it this way, wherever it puts S H A S T A

shortxjdoug
October 9th, 2006, 15:30
wherever it says Shasta on my post it puts a dude beating a horse. Cool......

i feell sorry for the horse........

DDCxj
October 9th, 2006, 15:32
Natick is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. Natick is located near the center of the MetroWest region of Massachusetts, with a population of 32,170 at the 2000 census.

Natick is affectionately known by its residents as the Home of Champions, recalling the performance of the town's firefighting team at the 1891 National Hook and Ladder competition.

The name Natick originates from the language of the Native American tribe known as the Massachusett, meaning "place of hills." The original settlement, on the southern side of Natick, is a hilly area. The southern side of town is called "South Natick," but is not a separate civic entity. The name Natick is pronounced NAY-tick, not NAT-ick.

History
Natick was first settled in 1651 by John Eliot, a Puritan missionary born in Widford, Hertfordshire, England who received a commission and funds from England's Long Parliament to settle the Wampanoag Indians on both sides of the Charles river. They were called Praying Indians - Eliot was best known for attempting to preserve the culture (minus the religion) of the Native Americans by putting them in planned towns where they could continue by their own rule. The colonial government placed such settlements in a ring of villages around Boston as a defensive strategy. Natick was the first and best documented of such settlements. The land was granted by the General Court, part of the Dedham Grant.

A school was set up, a government established, and the Indians were encouraged to convert to Christianity. During King Philip's War, the Natick Indians were sent to Deer Island. Many died of disease and cold, and the Indians who survived found their homes destroyed. The Indian village did not recover, and the land held in common by the Indian community was slowly sold off to white settlers to cover debts, and by 1725 most of the Natick Indians had drifted away.

The town was officially incorporated in 1781. Henry Wilson, born in 1812 and eighteenth Vice President of the United States, lived most of his life in Natick as a shoemaker and schoolteacher, and is buried there. He is the namesake of one of Natick's two middle schools.

Though Natick was primarily a farming town, the invention of the sewing machine in 1858 led to the growth of several shoe factories. The business flourished and peaked by 1880, when Natick, with twenty-three operating factories, was third in the nation in the quantity of shoes produced. The shoes made in Natick were primarily heavy work shoes with only one or two companies adding lighter dress shoes to their line. Natick was famous for its brogan, a heavy ankle-high boot worn by soldiers in the American Civil War.

Natick was also the birthplace of figure-eight stitching for baseballs. The wound core for a more resilient ball was developed by John W. Walcott and combined with the figure-eight stitching devised by Col. William A. Cutler. It was manufactured by the firm of H. Harwood & Sons in their factory built in 1858 - the first plant in the world for the manufacture of baseballs.

In 1874, a great fire in downtown Natick demolished 18 business blocks, two shoe factories, the Town Hall, Natick's only fire engine house and the Congregational Church, as well as many private homes. Though no lives were lost, the loss of property was greater in proportion to the town's wealth than the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. In 1875, Natick's new Central Fire Station was completed on Summer Street and opened with grand ceremony on the same city block where the great fire was first discovered.

Natick is home of the 2005 Division 2 Super Bowl champion high school football team. The Natick Redmen finished the season 13-0 with a win over Foxboro High School, and finished the year ranked #2 in Massachusetts.

Demographics
As of the census² of 2000, there were 32,170 people, 13,080 households, and 8,528 families residing in the town. The population density was 823.7/km² (2,132.9/mi²). There were 13,368 housing units at an average density of 342.3/km² (886.3/mi²). The racial makeup of the town was 90.02% White, 1.63% African American, 0.11% Native American, 3.86% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.77% from other races, and 1.56% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.97% of the population.

Natick in TV and Film
In the cartoon Family Guy, Peter and his family travel to Natick in search of a Twinkie factory after an apocalyptic Y2K incident. The Hostess factory referenced in the episode did exist at one time - Continental Bakeries, but has been torn down and is being replaced by an extension of (Chicago based) General Growth's Natick Mall.

Notable Residents - past and present
-Henry Wilson, the eighteenth Vice President of the United States, lived and -worked in Natick (as a cobbler) for much of his life.
-Harriet Beecher Stowe, abolitionist and author of Uncle Tom's Cabin, married
-Natick native Calvin Stowe and lived for a time in Natick.
-Horatio Alger, Jr., minister and author of children's books with a "rags to riches" theme, settled in Natick in 1860 and built his family home in South Natick.
-Alexander Wheelock Thayer, United States consul at Trieste in 1859 and author of the definitive biography of Ludwig von Beethoven published in 1866.
American leading man Don Terry of Natick entered films in 1928, freelancing until he was signed to a Columbia contract in 1937. Briefly groomed for stardom, he never quite rose above B-picture and serials, but was successful within those terms.
-American composer Thomas S. Allen was born in Natick.
-American composer Harold Shapero resides in Natick.
-Harold Kushner, author of When Bad Things Happen To Good People, lives in Natick. Retired now, for twenty-four years he was rabbi at Natick's Temple Israel.
-Broadway performer and two-time Tony Award nominee Alison Fraser grew up in Natick and graduated from Natick High in 1973.
-Jonathan Richman, proto-punk rock icon and founder of The Modern Lovers was born in Natick. In 1998 Jonathan was seen prominently in the film There's Something About Mary.
-NFL and CFL veteran Doug Flutie attended high school in Natick, before going to Boston College. Retiring from the New England Patriots after the 2005-06 season, Doug remains a Natick resident.
-Rene Rancourt, singer of the national anthem at Boston Bruins home games for the last 30 years, is a Natick resident.
-Susan Wornick, Emmy award winning TV anchor and consumer reporter on WCVB-TV Boston is a Natick native.
-Rick McKay, award-winning filmmaker and producer/director of several definitive documentaries on the history of Broadway theater, was born in Natick.
-American singer-songwriter Catie Curtis resides in Natick.
-Renowned statistician Eric Van grew up in Natick.
-Children's entertainer Joanie Bartels graduated from Natick High School, and is the first female children’s artist to receive RIAA Gold Record Certification, selling over 3,000,000 audio units and 100,000 video units to date.
-Meg Mallon, professional golfer on the LPGA Tour and twice winner of the U.S. Women's Open, was born in Natick.
-Caroline Hallisey, three time winter Olympian (1998, 2002, 2006) in Short Track Speedskating, was born and raised in Natick.
-James Bamford, an author and journalist who writes about the world of United States intelligence agencies.
-Scott Rhodes, weekend traffic reporter on Boston radio's WBZ (AM), attended Natick High School and the Actor's Workshop of Boston.
-Chief meteorologist Paul Dellegatto of WTVT FOX 13 in Tampa graduated from Natick High School.
-Susan Still-Kilrain, graduate of Walnut Hill School in Natick, is a former NASA astronaut and pilot of space shuttle Columbia flight STS-83.
-Rob Patterson, former guitarist for Otep and current touring guitarist for Korn, was born in Natick.
-Edward Allen, FAIA, architect, educator and author of several widely used books on the technology and construction of buildings, lives in Natick.

Located in Natick
-The U.S. Army Soldier Systems Center, a complex of military R&D facilities, produces military use items such as field rations, personal protective field equipment, and specialized uniforms.
-The Natick Mall, managed by General Growth Properties, Inc. of Chicago, is one of Boston's premier shopping centers and currently undergoing a major expansion.
-BJ's Wholesale Club Corporate Headquarters.
-Cognex Corporation Corporate Headquarters.
-The MathWorks Corporate Headquarters.
-Boston Scientific Corporate Headquarters. This site used to be the HQ for mini-computer manufacturer Prime Computer, Inc. Before Prime, Carling ran a Black Label brewery there.
-The Walnut Hill School is one of the nation's leading private secondary schools, offering particular emphasis in the studio and performing arts. Walnut Hill graduates more students to the Julliard School than any secondary school in the world.
-Casey's Diner, constructed in 1922, is one of the oldest operating ten-stool diners in the United States. Casey's Diner is diminutive in size at only 10 feet by 20-1/2 feet, and was constructed by the Worcester Lunch Car Company in Worcester, Massachusetts. Famous for its steamed hot dogs, Casey's originated as a horse-drawn lunch wagon that was parked on Natick Common.
-The Boden Lane Cemetery is a very small burial site established in 1815. Although the cemetery was established in that year, many of the gravestones are dated even earlier than this date. Some of the people buried this cemetery, go back to the times of the Revolutionary War. The Cemetery is a very interesting site to visit, for many of the gravestones are so old that the words on them are too faded to see. Some gravestones, are just little pieces of rock with nothing but initials on them! The cemetery is located on Boden Lane, to the right of Beaver Dam, and directly across the street from the Chabad Center of Natick.

SteelblueSteve
October 9th, 2006, 15:39
Plainfield is the headquarters city of Dale Coyne Racing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dale_Coyne_Racing), a team in the Champ Car World Series (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Champ_Car_World_Series)



Rev[/QUOTE]
Wasn't this at one time Coyne/Payton Racing, as in Walter Payton, greatest running back of all time and driver after retiring from the Bears?

Cornflake
October 9th, 2006, 15:40
That was from a period when an certain previous member would end his posts with hasta.
that does explain it :)

ChiXJeff
October 9th, 2006, 15:40
<grin> My home town is small enough to not even rate a Wikipedia entry, although it has produced someone in the Guiness Book of World Records (lookup up Roger Mason, MLB pitcher.)

The depressing thing is that Cannon Falls, MN where I'm now living apparently has a pretty darned good recording studio somewhere close at hand. It's biggest claim to faim is Nirvana recordings. IMHO, that's not something to write home about.

rock rash
October 9th, 2006, 15:44
There is a thriving beer culture in the city. In addition to an Anheuser-Busch (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anheuser-Busch) brewery — operating just north of the city since 1984 — there are three microbreweries, the New Belgium Brewing Company (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Belgium_Brewing_Company), the Odell Brewing Company (http://www.odellbrewing.com/), and the Fort Collins Brewery (http://www.fortcollinsbrewery.com/). New Belgium is the largest of the local microbreweries, with regional distribution west of the Mississippi. There are several brewpubs, including the original C.B. & Potts Restaurant and its Big Horn Brewery; CooperSmith's Pub & Brewing, a local mainstay since 1989; Lucky Joe's Sidewalk Saloon, a local favorite. The Colorado Brewer's Festival (http://downtownfortcollins.com/festivals.php/brewfest) is held in late June annually in Fort Collins. The outdoor event is held in Fort Collins' old town area and features beers from as many as 45 brewers from the state of Colorado and averages around 30,000 attendees.

Notable people born in Fort Collins


Isaac Adamson (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Adamson), author.
Jeremy Bloom (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeremy_Bloom), Olympic skier, model and former Colorado Buffaloes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Colorado) wide receiver and punt returner, recently drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philadelphia_Eagles) in the 2006 NFL Draft (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NFL_Draft).
Jeff D'Agostino, actor who has guest-starred on CSI (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CSI:_Crime_Scene_Investigation), Veronica Mars (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veronica_Mars), Weeds (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weeds_%28TV_series%29)
Jon Heder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jon_Heder), title character in 2004 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2004_in_film)'s Napoleon Dynamite (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napoleon_Dynamite)
Jake Lloyd (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jake_Lloyd), Anakin Skywalker in 1999 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1999_in_film)'s Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Wars_Episode_I:_The_Phantom_Menace)
David Mattingly (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Mattingly), science fiction illustrator
Pete Monty (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pete_Monty&action=edit), line backer for the Minnesota Vikings (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minnesota_Vikings)
Ryan Sutter (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryan_Sutter), bachelor chosen as a groom by Trista Rehn (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trista_Rehn) in 2003 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2003_in_television)'s "The Bachelorette (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bachelorette)"
Byron Raymond White (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byron_White), associate justice of the Supreme Court


Notable people who have lived in Fort Collins


Hattie McDaniel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hattie_McDaniel), first African-American to win an Academy Award (Best Supporting Actress 1940)
Susan Agnes Pearson (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Susan_Agnes_Pearson&action=edit), activist and poet
L. Neil Smith (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L._Neil_Smith), libertarian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libertarian) science fiction (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Science_fiction) author
Thomas Sutherland (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Sutherland), Colorado State University (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colorado_State_University) professor and former Beirut hostage

98XJSport
October 9th, 2006, 15:52
My town hardly has an entry, just some useless percentages. Yay, usless percentages! Its like highschool all over again.

Carthage is a town in Franklin County, Maine, United States. The population was 520 at the 2000 census.

[edit]
Geography
According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 86.2 km² (33.3 mi²). 85.9 km² (33.2 mi²) of it is land and 0.3 km² (0.1 mi²) of it (0.36%) is water.

[edit]
Demographics
As of the census2 of 2000, there were 520 people, 198 households, and 144 families residing in the town. The population density was 6.1/km² (15.7/mi²). There were 291 housing units at an average density of 3.4/km² (8.8/mi²). The racial makeup of the town was 97.31% White, 0.38% African American, 0.96% Native American, 0.19% Asian, 0.19% from other races, and 0.96% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.58% of the population.

There were 198 households out of which 34.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.1% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.8% were non-families. 19.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the town the population was spread out with 26.9% under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 33.1% from 25 to 44, 23.1% from 45 to 64, and 12.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 115.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 109.9 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $29,773, and the median income for a family was $32,917. Males had a median income of $30,625 versus $16,964 for females. The per capita income for the town was $12,169. About 8.2% of families and 12.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.4% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over.

Matthew Currie
October 9th, 2006, 16:07
Benson, VT, the unacknowledged sister city of the fictional town of Macondo, has a small Wikipedia entry, which I will not inflict on the forum community.

Defeating its school budget 18 times in a row, Benson, VT, a few years ago became something of a poster child for taxpayer rebellion against unfunded mandates. A drastically slashed budget was finally passed when the state threatened to close the school and charge the town for tuitioning students to neighboring towns.

Approximately 12 percent of Benson's residents live below the poverty line.

Approximately 3 percent of Benson's area is covered with water. The rest is covered with sticky clay, but Wikipedia doesn't bother to mention that.

Wikipedia does mention that Benson is alone among Vermont towns in having no state representative of its own. We do share a putative representative with Orwell, but "representative" is a term loosely applied in this case.

Benson is not a hotbed of culture, though there is an annual Burdock Festival. Wikipedia reports only two famous people from Benson. One was famous for hating Edgar Allen Poe, and the other, a senator from Arkansas, presumably got out of Benson early. However, I'm not dead yet, so we still have a shot at a third.

Not mentioned in Wikipedia is the role that Benson and its neighboring areas had in the religious history of the U.S. The Champlain Valley was more or less the originating point of "the burned-over patch," and Benson was at one time a hotbed of religious schism and controversy, with Baptists, Mormons and Seventh-day Adventists duking it out and radiating westward.

For those desiring to live in someplace that is as close as possible to no place at all, Benson offers many attractions. Tax burden is, alas, not among them.

Kurt04
October 9th, 2006, 16:08
No trivia here but...

Leadwood is a city in St. Francois County, Missouri, United States. The population was 1,160 at the 2000 census. The city is named after the element lead, which is mined in the area.

Leadwood was founded as Owl Creek in the 1903. Leadwood was settled by the St. Joesph Lead Company. Up until the late 1970's, Leadwood was lead capitol of the world.

Tradesman300
October 9th, 2006, 16:09
SeaTac, Washington

SeaTac is a city and outlying suburb (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suburb) of Seattle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle%2C_Washington), located in the southern section of King County (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_County%2C_Washington) in Washington State (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington). It is home to and named after the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle-Tacoma_International_Airport), also referred to as Sea-Tac, but spelled with a hyphen. The name of the city is an example of a portmanteau (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portmanteau), referencing the city's location between Seattle and Tacoma (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tacoma%2C_Washington), but is approximately twice as far from downtown Tacoma as it is from downtown Seattle. The population was 25,496 at the 2000 census.

That is about all SeaTac has, hookers and airplanes.

Sarge
October 9th, 2006, 16:42
Valley Park is a city in St. Louis County, Missouri, United States. The population was 6,518 at the 2000 census.

Valley Park has recently been at the center of a controversy. The Valley Park City Council recently approved an ordinance penalizing landlords and businesses for hiring and renting to illegal immigrants.
Contents


History

The town was a Mississippian Indian Settlement along the Meramec River as early as the mid-eighteenth century, until it was settled by french and german immigrant farmers in the 1760's. The town over time was known as Nasby, Suphur Springs, Quinette, Meramec, and then Valley Park around 1890. It was one of the first Post Offices in St. Louis County. It also became a railroad hub for the MO Pacific and St. Louis-San Francisco rail lines.

In 1894, the town became the site of the first Lynching in St. Louis County. A black man named John Buckner was lynched when accused of raping a local black woman and white teenager. He was taken from the authorities by several local residents and farmers and hung from the main bridge in town overlooking the Meramec River. The lynchers were never apprehended.

In 1909, the town became incorporated. As many as 70 trains passed through Valley Park on any given day. The town became a center for industry until the great flood of 1915, when the main bridge was destroyed, as were the huge factories along the river. The town never recovered.

Geography
Location of Valley Park, Missouri

Valley Park is located at 38°33′19″N, 90°29′18″W (38.555320, -90.488304)GR1.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 8.2 km² (3.2 mi²). 7.8 km² (3.0 mi²) of it is land and 0.4 km² (0.2 mi²) of it (5.03%) is water.

Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 6,518 people, 2,603 households, and 1,663 families residing in the city. The population density was 833.3/km² (2,156.2/mi²). There were 2,744 housing units at an average density of 350.8/km² (907.7/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 89.02% White, 4.11% African American, 0.09% Native American, 4.33% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.95% from other races, and 1.46% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.27% of the population.

There were 2,603 households out of which 37.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.4% were married couples living together, 11.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.1% were non-families. 28.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.3% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 41.5% from 25 to 44, 14.7% from 45 to 64, and 8.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $43,548, and the median income for a family was $54,063. Males had a median income of $40,956 versus $31,617 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,720. About 8.7% of families and 10.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.0% of those under age 18 and 1.8% of those age 65 or over.

jrsxj98
October 9th, 2006, 16:49
La Junta is a city in Otero County, Colorado, United States. The population was 7,568 at the 2000 census. La Junta is located in southeast Colorado, on the Arkansas River south of Pueblo. La Junta is home to two well-known museums: Bent's Fort, an important trading post in the old west, and the Koshare Indian Museum, regarded as one of the finest collections of Native American artifacts in the world. The Koshare Indian museum hosts a unique Boy Scout/Explorer program which trains the scouts in both Indian dance and costumes. The scouts give dance performances during the summer and also host many other troops passing through the area.

La Junta is also home of the Picketwire Center for Performing Arts , which offers a wide variety of culture.

Until recently La Junta had a major railyard for the Santa Fe Railroad for assembling trains and adding engines for the climb across the Raton Pass. In addition, in World War II La Junta had an Army Air Force Training Base outside town.

The airport, located 5 miles north of La Junta, has 77 acres of tarmac and two runways which are still in use. One runway (east-west) is 6,851 feet long and the other is 5,800 feet [1].

[edit]
Geography
La Junta is located at 37°58′53″N, 103°32′51″W (37.981333, -103.547540)GR1.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 7.4 km² (2.8 mi²), all land. La Junta is one of only three places in the United States (Lower 48 states) that is directly across from other pieces of land on the earth.

[edit]
Demographics
As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 7,568 people, 2,977 households, and 1,964 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,025.3/km² (2,652.0/mi²). There were 3,277 housing units at an average density of 443.9/km² (1,148.3/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 74.22% White, 1.22% African American, 1.77% Native American, 0.86% Asian, 0.13% Pacific Islander, 18.33% from other races, and 3.48% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 43.60% of the population.

There were 2,977 households out of which 33.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.0% were married couples living together, 14.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.0% were non-families. 30.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.1% under the age of 18, 10.4% from 18 to 24, 24.6% from 25 to 44, 21.4% from 45 to 64, and 16.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 89.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $29,002, and the median income for a family was $36,398. Males had a median income of $26,325 versus $21,324 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,928. About 16.8% of families and 21.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 31.4% of those under age 18 and 10.0% of those age 65 or over

Sarge
October 9th, 2006, 17:07
The town nearest to where I actually grew up:

Mechanicstown OH

Mechanicstown is in Carroll County, in the Canton-Massillon metro area. The community is in the Eastern Standard time zone.

The latitude of Mechanicstown is 40.618N. The longitude is -80.951W. Elevation is 1,243 feet.

Hell, that's more than I had to say.

Sarge

Sarge
October 9th, 2006, 17:18
This is what I actually prefer to call home altho it wont happen for awhile. Lived there and loved it:

Corpus Christi is the county seat of Nueces County and a coastal city located in the U.S. state of Texas. It is part of the region known as South Texas. As of the 2000 U.S. Census, the city had a population of 277,454 people (though a July 1, 2004 estimate placed the population at 281,196), making it the eighth-largest city in the state. The translation of the city's name is Body of Christ, given to the settlement by the Spanish, in honor of the Blessed Sacrament (Eucharist).

The city is often referred to as "The Sparkling City by the Sea," particularly in literature promoting tourism. Locals and natives often just call it Corpus. Since 2003, the city has earned numerous awards including:

* All-America City 2003
* Digital City
* One of the best cities to stretch your paycheck
* One of the least depressed cities in the nation

The city is home to Naval Air Station Corpus Christi. Corpus Christi is served by the Corpus Christi International Airport on the west side of the city.

Geography

Corpus Christi is located at 27°44′34″N, 97°24′7″W (27.742857, -97.401927)GR1.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1,192.0 km² (460.2 mi²). 400.5 km² (154.6 mi²) of it is land and 791.5 km² (305.6 mi²) of it (66.40%) is water. Drinking water for the city is supplied by two reservoirs, Lake Corpus Christi and the Choke Canyon Reservoir. Both reservoirs are outside the city limits, but are managed directly by public utility of the City of Corpus Christi.

Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 277,454 people, 98,791 households, and 70,437 families residing in the city. The population density was 692.7/km² (1,794.2/mi²). There were 107,831 housing units at an average density of 269.2/km² (697.3/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 71.62% White, 4.67% African American, 0.64% Native American, 1.28% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 18.58% from other races, and 3.13% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 54.33% of the population.

There were 98,791 households out of which 36.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.9% were married couples living together, 15.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.7% were non-families. 23.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.27.

In the city the population was spread out with 28.1% under the age of 18, 10.6% from 18 to 24, 29.2% from 25 to 44, 21.0% from 45 to 64, and 11.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $36,414, and the median income for a family was $41,672. Males had a median income of $31,863 versus $22,616 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,419. About 14.1% of families and 17.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.9% of those under age 18 and 15.5% of those age 65 or over. Average rents in Corpus Christi in 2005 were $599 for a one bedroom apartment, and $769 for a two bedroom apartment.

People and culture

Corpus Christi is or was home to these celebrities: the actors Eva Longoria, Farrah Fawcett, Lou Diamond Phillips, Lori Singer, Marc Singer, Barbara Barrie, Pepe Serna and Dabney Coleman; Playboy model Brandie Moses; reality stars Colin Guinn and Christie Lee Woods (Amazing Race 5); writer, director, producer Kim Henkel (Texas Chainsaw Massacre) the musicians and singers Paula DeAnda,Danny Lohner (of Nine Inch Nails), Selena, Freddy Fender, Sam Neely, Chris Layton (drummer for Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble) and Jim Heath (of The Reverend Horton Heat), Louise Mandrell, Jennifer Pena; playwright Larry L. King (Best Little Whorehouse in Texas); clothing designer Todd Oldham; game show host Allen Ludden; the sports figures Raymond Berry (NFL Hall of Famer), Brian Leetch (NHL player), NASCAR drivers Terry Labonte and brother Bobby Labonte (the only brothers to each win a Winston Cup title, Labonte Park on the north side of town is named for them); Major League pitcher Burt Hooton; Olympians (sailing) Paul Foerster and Amy Acuff (track and field); Olympian and Tour de France cyclist Bobby Julich; futurist Laurence F. Johnson; Mexican-American activist Dr. Héctor Pérez García; Marshall Applewhite (leader of the Heaven's Gate cult); and local newscaster & Guinness record holder Walter Furley. Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale codeveloper Robert Simpson is also from Corpus Christi. In fact, he was nearly killed by a hurricane in Corpus Christi, which sparked his interest in meteorology. Corpus Christi is also the hometown of Whataburger.

The city is home to the Corpus Christi Rayz of the Central Hockey League, Corpus Christi Hooks of the AA-Baseball Texas League, the Corpus Christi Hammerheads of the Intense Football League, and is rumiored to be getting a team in arenafootball2 for the 2007 season.

The Corpus Christi Caller-Times is the local paper of record.

Local attractions

Various sections of Corpus Christi maintain distinct senses of identity and community from the city proper, especially the Calallen and Flour Bluff areas, and, less prominently, Clarkwood and Annaville. These areas are sometimes mistakenly believed to be separate municipalities.

The city is home to a number of popular destinations for both tourists and residents. In the southeast part of the city, near the Pharaoh Valley subdivision, is the Hans A. Suter Wildlife Area. It is on the western shore of the Cayo del Oso and is considered to be one of the best sea bird watching areas in the world. The nearby Pharaohs Golf Club course also serves as a haven for migratory birds. Some of the most visited attractions are probably on North Beach, where the Texas State Aquarium and the USS Lexington Museum on the Bay are located. Nearby is Corpus Christi's museum district. Located there are the Museum of Asian Cultures, Corpus Christi Museum of Science and History, the South Texas Museum of Art, and the Harbor Playhouse theatre, one of the oldest continually operating community theatres in the State. Heritage Park is also in the museum district, where a number of older restored houses can be found. The downtown area, of which the museum district is a part, is home to skyscrapers, companies, various shops, a very popular center of marinas, and Mirador de la Flor. Also in the city is the Corpus Christi Botanical Gardens and Nature Center which hosts gardening programs from time to time.

Directly east of Corpus Christi are Padre Island and Mustang Island, home to various municipal, state, and national parks, most notably Padre Island National Seashore. The city is also near King Ranch, one of the world's largest ranches, upon which the movie Giant was based.

Yearly the city also celebrates the Buchaneer's Carnival, which is typically held downtown. South Padre Island Drive (locally abbreviated as "S.P.I.D.", with the letters pronounced individually), is the city's main retail corridor, with two shopping malls facing each other and a number of large shopping centers, small strip centers, and scores of restaurants of various kinds.

Education

Colleges and universities

Corpus Christi is home to several institutions of higher learning: Del Mar College, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi (formerly known by the following three names: Corpus Christi State University (CCSU), Texas A&I University at Corpus Christi, and University of Corpus Christi, but now a component of the Texas A&M University System), Our Lady of Corpus Christi, a private, Roman Catholic university, a branch of the Coastal Bend College education program, and numerous vocational schools including Southern Careers Institute and Vogue Cosmetology School.

Del Mar College [2] is a local community college begun in the 1940's at a location behind Wynn Seale Jr. H. S. The main campus began with the administration building which was constructed after WWII on Del Mar. The college grew to encompass a good portion of a residential addition called Southmoreland built from the Bohemian farm lands in the late 1930s. Del Mar now includes a West campus located in area of Corpus Christi that once was Cliff Maus Airport.

Schools

Five school districts provide primary and secondary education for area residents: Corpus Christi Independent School District, Calallen ISD, Flour Bluff ISD, Tuloso-Midway ISD, and West Oso ISD. The Roman Catholic Diocese of Corpus Christi provides the primary and secondary education for Catholic schools.

Magazine

* cbBeat Magazine
* Texas Coastal Enthusiast Magazine
* FYI

Newspaper

* Corpus Christi Caller-Times

Local television

* KIII Ch. 3 (ABC) (is featured in HD)
* KRIS Ch. 6 (NBC) (is featured in HD)
* KZTV Ch. 10 (CBS) (is featured in HD)
* KEDT Ch. 16 (PBS) (is featured in HD)
* KTOV Ch. 21 (UPN)
* KDWB Ch. 23 (WB)
* KORO Ch. 28 (UNI)
* KDF Ch. 47 (FOX)
* KAJA Ch. 68 (TEL)

Radio
AM stations

* 1200AM
* KKTX-1360, "News Radio 1360"
* KEYS-1440, "KEYS 1440 News*Talk"

FM stations

* KMXR-93.9, "Oldies 93.9"
* KBSO-94.7, "Texas Radio 94.7"
* KZFM-95.5, "Hot z95"
* KLTG-96.5, "The Beach 96.5"
* KFTX-97.5, "Real Country 97.5 KFTX"
* KRYS-99.1, "K-99 The Country Station"
* KSAB-99.9, "Tejano 99.9"
* KNCN-101.3, "C-101 Rocks"
* KOUL-103.7, "KOUL"
* JAKE-107.3, "JAKE FM"

Cornflake
October 9th, 2006, 17:21
SeaTac, Washington
That is about all SeaTac has, hookers and airplanes.

I lived in Federal Way for awhile and agree on the hookers and airplanes :)

OT
October 9th, 2006, 17:24
I was banned from Corpus Christi back in '96.
You can have it.

I do like the Type O Negative song, though.:guitar:

Ramsey
October 9th, 2006, 17:25
my post went the way of old yeller :tear:

Sarge
October 9th, 2006, 17:28
I was banned from Corpus Christi back in '96.
You can have it.

I do like the Type O Negative song, though.:guitar:

What the heck did ya do to get banned from there? Hell with a huge summer break season every year we saw a lot of shit. And some sweet dune bunnies. Gots a nude beach that takes a 4x4 to get. Watched a C130 push a shitload of big bales of....let's say a smokable substance out the back door while flying at almost wave top level. Followed shortly later by a chopper and some Coasties in a small prop job. High quality stuff...if I had actually sampled it. *grin*

Sarge

OT
October 9th, 2006, 17:31
What the heck did ya do to get banned from there? Hell with a huge summer break season every year we saw a lot of shit. And some sweet dune bunnies. Gots a nude beach that takes a 4x4 to get. Watched a C130 push a shitload of big bales of....let's say a smokable substance out the back door while flying at almost wave top level. Followed shortly later by a chopper and some Coasties in a small prop job. High quality stuff...if I had actually sampled it. *grin*

Sarge
Battery on a guy at a club called The Ucitan.
I was staioned in NC at the time, so I had to fly back for court.
Man, that was a baaaad ordeal altogether.

XJ_ranger
October 9th, 2006, 17:42
Moore, Oklahoma


Demographics:
The racial makeup of the city is 84.63% White, 2.92% Black, 4.14% Native American, 1.62% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 1.75% from other races, and 4.89% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race are 5.10% of the population.


http://www.savepic.com/freepicturehosting/is.php?i=497655&img=HOME.JPG


what are they getting for a house out there? you've got my attention...

:D :D

jeepinandy
October 9th, 2006, 17:48
I was going to post mine, but it said I was wasting my time....

ZPD
October 9th, 2006, 17:54
I looked mine up and I didn't know about Sonny Barger or the origins of the Universal Life "Chuch"

Famous/Infamous People From Modesto

* Scott Mitchell - Famous attorney known for his shrewd and agressive arguments in court
* Cliff Barrows - lifelong assistant and director to Christian evangelist Billy Graham
* Chidi Ahanotu - NFL defensive end
* Carter Williams - K1 (kickboxing) World Champion
* Gary Condit - Former Congressman
* Tony Graziani - Arena Football League quarterback
* George Lucas - Writer, Producer, Director
* Ann Veneman - UNICEF Executive Director/Former US Secretary of Agriculture
* James Marsters - Actor (Best known as "Spike" From the hit television show, Buffy The Vampire Slayer)
* Chuck Hayes - NBA Basketball player
* Timothy Olyphant - Actor (Deadwood, The Girl Next Door - Attended Fred C. Beyer High School)
* Mark Spitz - 1972 Olympic Champion in Swimming
* Kenny Roberts - Three times 500cc motorcycle world champion
* Mike Allsup - Guitarist from Three Dog Night
* Sonny Barger - founding member of the original Oakland, California, chapter of Hells Angels
* Harve Presnell - American Actor
* Kirby J. Hensley - Founder of Universal Life Church
* Carol Channing - American Broadway and Film Actress
* Cyrus "Cy" Young - 1952 Olympic Champion in Javelin
* Wilbur "Moose" Thompson - 1948 Olympic Champion in Shot Put
* Ray Lankford - Former Major League Baseball Outfielder First 1,000 yard rusher for Modesto Junior College
* Gino Marchetti - Former Defensive End for Baltimore Colts, NFL Hall of Fame Member
* Jason Lytle - Lead singer and founder of the critically acclaimed band Grandaddy
* Scott Peterson - Convicted murderer of his wife Laci Peterson, whose trial garnered national attention

Interesting Facts

Modesto is the setting for the movie American Graffiti created by George Lucas, who was born in the city (the actual location of the set was Petaluma, California). Many of the characters and scenes from the movie are based on actual events that happened in Modesto during the time that Lucas went to high school there.

Modesto and the greater Modesto area have recently been associated with high profile murders, including Chandra Levy and Laci Peterson. It was also the district of former congressman Gary Condit. Although Scott Peterson has been convicted and sentenced to die for the killing of his wife, the method of administering death in California is now in judicial suspension.

Modesto is Home to the Modesto Nuts of the High-A California League (Colorado Rockies minor league team); the Nuts play their home games at John Thurman Field. Modesto is also the home of the critically acclaimed musical group Grandaddy, the E & J Gallo Winery, and the McHenry Mansion.

The Universal Life Church headquarters are based in Modesto, California.

Beej
October 9th, 2006, 17:57
Chlilliwhack did:
http://www.naxja.org/forum/../../mmrweb/img/artisthist1b.jpg (http://www.naxja.org/forum/ArtistSongHistory.asp?Artist=CHILLIWACK)
Watcha Gonna Do
My Girl (Gone, Gone, Gone)

The rest I do not recall.Chilliwack named themselves after the place they were from. Just like several other 70's and 80's bands: Boston, Toronto, Chilliwack...

Beej
October 9th, 2006, 18:05
Victoria, British Columbia

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This article refers to the city of Victoria. Information on Greater Victoria (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_Victoria%2C_British_Columbia) can be found in the Greater Victoria (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_Victoria%2C_British_Columbia) article. For electoral districts with the name Victoria, or in the area of greater Victoria, please see Victoria (electoral districts) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_%28electoral_districts%29) Victoria
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:VictoriaParlimentBldg.jpg) British Columbia Legislative Buildings in Victoria

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Location of Victoria within the Capital Regional District (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_Regional_District%2C_British_Columbia) in British Columbia, Canada Area (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Area) 633 km² Population (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Population) 335,000 Pop'n density 529.2 /km² Location (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geographic_coordinate_system) 48°25′N 123°21′W (http://tools.wikimedia.de/%7Emagnus/geo/geohack.php?params=48_25_N_123_21_W_%7B%7B%7B7%7D% 7D%7D) Altitude (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altitude) 23 metres (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metre) Incorporation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Municipal_corporation) 1849 Province (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provinces_and_territories_of_Canada) British Columbia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Columbia) Regional District (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_British_Columbia_Regional_Districts) Capital (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_Regional_District%2C_British_Columbia) Members of Parliament (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Members_of_the_Canadian_House_of_Commons) Denise Savoie (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denise_Savoie) Members of the Legislative Assembly (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legislative_Assembly_of_British_Columbia) Carole James (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carole_James), Rob Fleming (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rob_Fleming) Mayor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mayor) Alan Lowe (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Lowe)
(past mayors (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mayors_of_Victoria%2C_British_Columbia)) Governing Body (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Governing_Body) Victoria City Council (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_City_Council) Time zone (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_zone) PST (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Standard_Time) (UTC (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UTC)-8) Postal code (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_postal_code) V0S, V8N-V8Z, V9A-V9E Area Code (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Area_Code) +1-250 Victoria.BC.ca (http://www.city.victoria.bc.ca/) Victoria is a Canadian city (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cities_in_Canada), and the provincial (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provinces_of_Canada) capital of British Columbia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Columbia). It is also the seat of the Capital Regional District (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_Regional_District%2C_British_Columbia). Victoria is located on the southern tip of Vancouver Island (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vancouver_Island) and is a global tourist destination. Its other main industries are government, the technology sector and the Canadian Navy.
Contents

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1 Location and population (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria%2C_British_Columbia#Location_and_populati on)
2 History (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria%2C_British_Columbia#History)
3 Climate (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria%2C_British_Columbia#Climate)
4 Physiography and Soils (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria%2C_British_Columbia#Physiography_and_Soil s)
5 Neighbourhoods of Victoria (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria%2C_British_Columbia#Neighbourhoods_of_Vic toria)
6 Other facts (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria%2C_British_Columbia#Other_facts)
7 Sister cities (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria%2C_British_Columbia#Sister_cities)
8 Sports teams (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria%2C_British_Columbia#Sports_teams)
9 Media outlets (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria%2C_British_Columbia#Media_outlets)
9.1 Print (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria%2C_British_Columbia#Print)
9.2 AM radio (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria%2C_British_Columbia#AM_radio)
9.3 FM radio (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria%2C_British_Columbia#FM_radio)
9.4 Television (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria%2C_British_Columbia#Television)
10 See also (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria%2C_British_Columbia#See_also)
11 External links (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria%2C_British_Columbia#External_links) //
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Location and population

Located on the southeastern tip of Vancouver Island (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vancouver_Island), overlooking the Strait of Juan de Fuca (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strait_of_Juan_de_Fuca), the City of Victoria has a population of approximately 74,100, and is the thirteenth most populous municipality in the province. The metropolitan area (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metropolitan_area) comprising thirteen municipalities informally referred to as Greater Victoria (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_Victoria) has a population of more than 335,000 and is the largest urban area on Vancouver Island.[1] (http://www12.statcan.ca/english/census01/products/standard/popdwell/Table-CSD-P.cfm?T=2&PR=59&SR=776&S=1&O=A). It also currently ranks as the 14th largest metropolitan area (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_the_100_largest_metropolitan_areas_in_Cana da) in Canada.
The city's chief industries are tourism, provincial government administration, and the technology sector. Other major employers include the Canadian Forces (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Forces) (the Township of Esquimalt (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Esquimalt%2C_British_Columbia) is the home of the Pacific headquarters of the Canadian Forces Maritime Command (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Forces_Maritime_Command)), and the University of Victoria (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Victoria) (located in the municipalities of Oak Bay (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oak_Bay%2C_British_Columbia) and Saanich (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saanich%2C_British_Columbia)).
The city of Greater Victoria is the southernmost urban area in Western Canada (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada), located below the northern 49th parallel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/49th_parallel), which bisects Vancouver Island at the community of Ladysmith, British Columbia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ladysmith%2C_British_Columbia).
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History

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a1/Kwakwaka%27wakw_big_house.jpg/180px-Kwakwaka%27wakw_big_house.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Kwakwaka%27wakw_big_house.jpg) http://en.wikipedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Kwakwaka%27wakw_big_house.jpg)
Wawadit'la, also known as Mungo Martin House, a Kwakwaka'wakw "big house", with heraldic pole (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Totem_pole). Built by Chief Mungo Martin in 1953. Located at Thunderbird Park (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thunderbird_Park) in Victoria, British Columbia.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria%2C_British_Columbia#_note-0)


Prior to the arrival of the Europeans in the late 1700s, the Victoria area was home to several communities of Coast Salish (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coast_Salish) peoples, including the Songish (Songhees). The Spanish and British took up the exploration of the northwest coast of North America beginning with the voyage of Captain James Cook (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Cook) in 1776, although the Victoria area of the Strait of Juan de Fuca was not penetrated until 1791. Spanish sailors visited Esquimalt (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Esquimalt) harbour (within the modern Capital Regional District) in 1790 and again in 1792. Founded by the Hudson's Bay Company (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hudson%27s_Bay_Company) in 1843 as Fort Camosun (after the "camosack", a type of wild lily (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lily) native to southern Vancouver Island) as a fur trading (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fur_trade) post, the settlement was later called Fort Victoria, in honour of Queen Victoria (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_Victoria) [2] (http://www.city.victoria.bc.ca/visitors/about_hist.shtml). The Songhees established a village across the harbour from the fort. The Songhees' village was later moved north of Esquimalt (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Esquimalt). When the crown Colony of Vancouver Island (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colony_of_Vancouver_Island) was established in 1849, a town was laid out on the site and made the capital of the colony. The Chief Factor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factor) of the fort, James Douglas (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Douglas_%28governor%29) was made governor of the colony, and would be the leading figure in the early development of the city until his retirement in 1864.
With the discovery of gold (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gold) on the British Columbia mainland in 1858, Victoria became the port, supply base, and outfitting centre for miners on their way to the Fraser Canyon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fraser_Canyon) gold fields, mushrooming from a population of 300 to over 5000 literally within a few days. In 1866 when the island was politically united with the mainland, Victoria remained the capital of the new united colony (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Colonies_of_Vancouver_Island_and_British_Co lumbia) and became the provincial capital when British Columbia joined the Canadian Confederation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Confederation) in 1871. Victoria was incorporated as a city in 1862. In 1865 Esquimalt (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Esquimalt%2C_British_Columbia) was made the North Pacific home of the Royal Navy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Navy), and remains Canada's west coast naval base.
In 1886, with the completion of the Canadian Pacific Railway (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Pacific_Railway) terminus on Burrard Inlet (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burrard_Inlet), Victoria's position as the commercial centre of British Columbia was irrevocably lost to the City of Vancouver (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vancouver). The city subsequently began cultivating an image of genteel civility within its natural setting, an image aided by the impressions of visitors such as Rudyard Kipling (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudyard_Kipling), the opening of the popular Butchart Gardens (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butchart_Gardens) in 1904 and the construction of the Empress Hotel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Empress_%28Hotel%29) by the Canadian Pacific Railway (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Pacific_Railway) in 1908. Sir Robert Dunsmuir (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Dunsmuir), a leading industrialist whose interests included coal mines and a railway on Vancouver Island, constructed Craigdarroch Castle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craigdarroch_Castle) in the Rockland area, near the official residence of the province's lieutenant-governor. His son James Dunsmuir (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Dunsmuir) became premier and subsequently lieutenant-governor of the province and built his own grand residence at Hatley Park (used for several decades as a military college, now Royal Roads University (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Roads_University)) in the present City of Colwood (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colwood%2C_British_Columbia).
A real estate and development boom ended just before World War I, leaving Victoria with a large stock of Edwardian public, commercial and residential structures that have greatly contributed to the City's character. A number of municipalities surrounding Victoria were incorporated during this period, including the Township of Esquimalt, the District of Oak Bay (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oak_Bay%2C_British_Columbia), and several municipalities on the Saanich peninsula. Since World War II the Victoria area has seen relatively steady growth, becoming home to two major universities. Since the 1980s the western suburbs have been incorporated as new municipalities, such as Colwood and Langford. The thirteen municipal governments within the Capital Regional District afford the residents a great deal of local autonomy, although there are periodic calls for amalgamation.
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Climate

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/5/54/Victoriaharbour2.jpg/300px-Victoriaharbour2.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Victoriaharbour2.jpg) http://en.wikipedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Victoriaharbour2.jpg)
Victoria's Inner Harbour with The Empress hotel in the background.


Victoria has a sub-Mediterranean climate[3] (http://www.city.victoria.bc.ca/visitors/about_clmt.shtml)[4] (http://www.bootsnall.com/articles/04-08/victoria-bc-climate.html), with mild, damp winters and cool to warm, dry summers. Daily temperatures rise above 30°C (86°F) on an average of one or two days per year and fall below -5°C (23°F) on an average of only 2 nights per year. During the winter, the average daily high and low temperatures are 8.2°C (47°F) and 3.6°C (38°F), respectively. The summer months are equally mild, with an average high temperature of 19.6°C (67°F) and low of 11.3°C (52°F). Victoria does occasionally experience more extreme temperatures. The highest temperature ever recorded in Victoria was 35.3°C (96°F) on July 23, 2004, while the coldest temperature on record was -15.6°C (4°F) on December 29, 1968. Victoria has not recorded a temperature below -10°C (14°F) since 1990.
Thanks to the rain shadow (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rain_shadow) effect of the nearby Olympic Mountains (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olympic_Mountains) in Washington State, Victoria is the driest location on British Columbia's coasts, experiencing much lower rainfall than other nearby areas. Total annual precipitation is just 608mm (24in) at the Gonzales weather station in Victoria, contrasted to nearby Seattle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle), (137 km/85 miles away to the southeast), with 970mm (38in) of rainfall, or Vancouver (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vancouver), 100 km away, with 1,219 mm (48in) of rainfall. Perhaps even more dramatic is the difference in rainfalls on Vancouver Island. Port Renfrew (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Renfrew), just 80 km from Victoria on the wet southwest coast of Vancouver Island receives 3,671mm (145in). Even the Victoria Airport, 25 km north of the city, receives about 45% more precipitation than the city proper. One of the most striking features of Victoria's climate is the distinct dry and rainy seasons. Nearly two thirds of the annual precipitation falls during the four wettest months, November to February. Precipitation in December, the wettest month (109mm/4in) is nearly eight times as high as in July, the driest month (14mm/.5in). During the summer months, Victoria is the driest major city in Canada.
Victoria averages just 26cm (10in) of snow annually. Every few decades, Victoria receives very large snowfalls, including the more than 100cm (39in) of snow that fell in December 1996. On the other hand, roughly one third of winters will see virtually no snow, with less than 5cm (2in) falling during the entire season. When snow does fall, it rarely lasts long on the ground. Victoria averages just 2-3 days per year with at least 5cm (2in) of snow on the ground.
The rainshadow effect also means that Victoria gets more sunshine than surrounding areas. With 2,223 hours of sun annually, Victoria is one of the sunniest places in British Columbia, and gets more sunshine than most other cities in Canada except those in the southern Prairies. The benefits of Victoria's climate are evident through the city's gardens, which are more likely to display drought-tolerant oak trees, eucalyptus, arbutus, and even bananas, than they are likely to feature evergreen conifers, which are often associated with the coastal Pacific Northwest environment.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8f/Flower-basket-victoria-BC.JPG/180px-Flower-basket-victoria-BC.JPG (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Flower-basket-victoria-BC.JPG) http://en.wikipedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Flower-basket-victoria-BC.JPG)
Colourful flowers bedeck the genteel "Garden City" downtown




Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Average daily maximum °C 7.0 8.6 10.6 13.1 15.9 17.9 19.8 20.1 18.5 13.8 9.4 7.1 13.5 Average daily minimum °C 3.0 3.7 4.5 6.0 8.2 10.0 11.3 11.7 10.7 7.9 5.0 3.2 7.1
Average precipitation mm 94.3 71.7 46.5 28.5 25.8 20.7 14.0 19.7 27.4 51.2 98.9 108.9 607.6 Average total snow cm 9.7 3.5 1.1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4.1 7.8 26.3 Average Sunshine h 78 102 150 205 267 271 331 303 222 148 81 65 2223 Data [5] (http://www.climate.weatheroffice.ec.gc.ca/climate_normals/results_e.html?Province=BC%20%20&StationName=&SearchType=&LocateBy=Province&Proximity=25&ProximityFrom=City&StationNumber=&IDType=MSC&CityName=&ParkName=&LatitudeDegrees=&LatitudeMinutes=&LongitudeDegrees=&LongitudeMinutes=&NormalsClass=A&SelNormals=&StnId=113&)

Victoria's equable climate has also added to its reputation as the "City of Gardens" . With its mild temperatures and plentiful sunshine, Victoria boasts gardens that are home to many plant species rarely found elsewhere in Canada. Several species of palms, eucalyptus, and even certain varieties of bananas can be seen growing throughout the area's gardens. The city takes pride in the many flowers that bloom during the winter and early spring, including crocuses, daffodils, early-blooming rhododendrons, cherry and plum trees. Every Februrary there is an annual "flower count" in what for the rest of the country and most of the province is still the dead of winter.
Due to its Mediterranean-type climate, southeastern Vancouver Island is also home to many rare native plants found nowhere else in Canada, including Quercus garryana (Garry oak (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garry_oak)), Arctostaphylos columbiana (Hairy manzanita (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manzanita)), and Canada's only broadleaf evergreen tree, Arbutus menziesii (Pacific madrone (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_madrone)). Many of these endangered species exist here at the northern end of their range, and are found as far south as Central and Southern California, and even parts of Mexico.
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Physiography and Soils

The landscape of Victoria was molded by water in various forms. Pleistocene glaciation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleistocene_glaciation) put the area under a thick ice cover, the weight of which depressed the land below present sea level. These glaciers also deposited stony sandy loam till (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glacial_till). As they retreated, their meltwater left thick deposits of sand (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sand) and gravel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravel). Marine clay (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clay) settled on what would later become dry land. Post-glacial rebound, which is still in progress, let the present-day terrain be exposed to air, with beach sand and gravel deposits in many places. The resulting soils are highly variable in texture, and abrupt textural changes are common. In general, clays are most likely to be encountered in the northern part of town and in depressions. The southern part has coarse-textured subsoils and loamy topsoils. Sandy loams and loamy sands are common in the eastern part adjoining Oak Bay (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oak_Bay). Victoria's soils are relatively unleached and less acidic than soils elsewhere on the British Columbia coast. Their thick dark topsoils denoted a high level of fertility which made them valuable for farming until urbanization took over.
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Neighbourhoods of Victoria

The following is a list of neighbourhoods in the City of Victoria. For a list of neighbourhoods in other area municipalities, see Greater Victoria (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_Victoria), or the individual entries for those municipalities.

Chinatown (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinatown%2C_Victoria%2C_British_Columbia)
East Burnside-Gorge
Fairfield (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairfield_%28Greater_Victoria%29)
Fernwood (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fernwood_%28Greater_Victoria%29)
James Bay
North Jubilee
South Jubilee
North Park
Rockland
Downtown
Rock Bay (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_Bay_%28Greater_Victoria%29) [edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Victoria%2C_British_Columbia&action=edit&section=6)]

Other facts


(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Victoria_skyline_BC.jpg) http://en.wikipedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Victoria_skyline_BC.jpg)
Victoria, British Columbia.



(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Parlament_victoria_BC.jpg) http://en.wikipedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Parlament_victoria_BC.jpg)
British Columbia Parliament Buildings in Victoria.



(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Victoriaskyline.jpg) http://en.wikipedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Victoriaskyline.jpg)
Victoria's skyline in May 2006.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/de/Chinatown_Victoria_gate_lion.jpg/180px-Chinatown_Victoria_gate_lion.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Chinatown_Victoria_gate_lion.jpg) http://en.wikipedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Chinatown_Victoria_gate_lion.jpg)
One of the stone lions that guards the gate of Chinatown in Victoria.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/a/ad/Totem_pole_VicBC.jpg/180px-Totem_pole_VicBC.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Totem_pole_VicBC.jpg) http://en.wikipedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Totem_pole_VicBC.jpg)
Totem pole on the inner harbour.


According to Statistics Canada, Victoria's crime rate in 1999 was the second highest in the country (11,865 crimes per 100,000 population). By 2002, Victoria was ranked fifth for overall crime (10,146 crimes per 100,000 population). These figures, however, represent the skewing effect of considering crimes committed in "downtown" Victoria in relation only to the "downtown" population. The Greater Victoria area comprises 13 separate municipalities (total pop. 335,000 CMA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Census_Metropolitan_Area)). The City of Victoria (pop. 74,100) acts as "downtown" for all of the outlying municipalities, hence the counter-intuitive and inflated crime figures.
The oldest (and most intact) Chinatown (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinatown) in Canada is located within Victoria. In the heart of downtown are the Parliament Buildings (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Columbia_Parliament_Buildings), the Fairmont Empress Hotel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Empress_%28Hotel%29) and the acclaimed Royal British Columbia Museum (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_British_Columbia_Museum), with large exhibits on local Aboriginal peoples (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aboriginal_peoples_in_British_Columbia), Natural History (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_History) and Modern History (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modern_History). In addition, the heart of downtown also has the Royal London Wax Museum (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Royal_London_Wax_Museum&action=edit), Victoria Bug Zoo (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Bug_Zoo), and the Pacific Undersea Gardens (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Undersea_Gardens), which showcases the Giant Pacific Octopus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant_Pacific_Octopus), the Wolf Eel (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Wolf_Eel&action=edit) and other marine life of British Columbia. North of the city on the Saanich Peninsula are the Butchart Gardens (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butchart_Gardens), one of the biggest tourist attractions on the island, as well as the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominion_Astrophysical_Observatory), Victoria Butterfly Gardens (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Butterfly_Gardens) and Centre of the Universe (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Centre_of_the_Universe&action=edit) planetarium[6] (http://www.hia-iha.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/cu/main_e.html). There are also numerous National Historic Sites (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_National_Historic_Sites_of_Canada), such as the Fisgard Lighthouse (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fisgard_Lighthouse), Craigflower Manor and Schoolhouse (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Craigflower_Manor_and_Schoolhouse&action=edit), Hatley Castle and Hatley Park (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hatley_Park_National_Historic_Site) and Fort Rodd Hill (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Rodd_Hill), which is a coastal artillery fort built in the late 1890s, located west of the city in Colwood. Also located west of the city you will find Western Speedway (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Western_Speedway&action=edit), a 4/10th-mile oval and the largest in Western Canada.
Beacon Hill Park (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beacon_Hill_Park) is the city's main urban green space. Its area of 620 square kilometres lie along Victoria's southern shore, and includes numerous playing fields, manicured gardens, exotic species of plants and animals such as wild peacocks, and a petting zoo. The park also includes a few areas of natural Garry oak (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garry_oak) meadow habitat, an increasingly scarce ecosystem that once dominated the region. Each summer, Beacon Hill Park plays host to several outdoor concerts, and the popular Luminara Community Lantern Festival.
The Victoria Symphony (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Symphony), led by Tania Miller (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Tania_Miller&action=edit) performs at the Royal Theatre (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Theatre_%28Victoria%29) and the Farquhar Auditorium of the University of Victoria from September to May. Every BC Day weekend, the Symphony mounts "Symphony Splash (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Symphony_Splash&action=edit)", a popular outdoor event that includs a performance by the orchestra sitting on a barge in Victoria's Inner Harbour. Streets in the local area are closed, as each year approximately 40,000 people attend a variety of concerts and events throughout the day. The event culminates with the Symphony's evening concert, with Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture as the grand finale, replete with cannon-fire, a pealing carillon and a fireworks display to honour BC Day.
The only Canadian Forces Primary Reserve brass/reed band on Vancouver Island (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vancouver_Island) is located in Victoria. The 5th (British Columbia) Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery Band (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=5th_%28British_Columbia%29_Field_R egiment%2C_Royal_Canadian_Artillery_Band&action=edit) traces its roots back to 1864, making it the oldest, continually-operational military band west of Thunder Bay, Ontario. Its mandate is to support the island's military community by performing at military dinners, parades and ceremonies, and other events. The band performs weekly in August at Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Site where the Regiment started manning the guns of the fort in 1896, and also performs every year at the Cameron Bandshell at Beacon Hill Park.
Victoria can be reached by air and ferry. The Victoria International Airport (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_International_Airport) has non-stop flights to and from Toronto, Honolulu (winter), Salt Lake City, Seattle and many cities throughout Western Canada. Multiple scheduled helicopter and seaplane flights are avaialble daily between Victoria harbour and Vancouver International Airport (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vancouver_International_Airport) or Vancouver harbour (35 minute flights). The BC Ferries (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BC_Ferries) Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal, located 29 kilometers north of Victoria, is a bustling terminal with hourly sailings to Tsawwassen (a ferry terminal south of Vancouver) and to many of the Gulf Islands (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_Islands). The Washington State Ferry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_State_Ferry) terminal in Sidney, British Columbia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidney%2C_British_Columbia) provides ferry service to Friday Harbor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friday_Harbor), Orcas Island (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orcas_Island), and ultimately Anacortes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anacortes), Washington. In Victoria's Inner Harbour, an international ferry terminal provides car ferry service to Port Angeles (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Angeles), Washington state (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_state), high-speed catamaran service to downtown Seattle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle), and seasonal passenger ferries to destinations in Washington State including Friday Harbor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friday_Harbor), Port Angeles (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Angeles), and Bellingham (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bellingham). Victoria also serves as the western terminus (Mile Zero) for Canada's Trans-Canada Highway (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trans-Canada_Highway), the longest national highway in the world.
With its perceived laid-back attitude, it is not surprising that for over ten years the Hempology 101 (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hempology_101&action=edit) non-profit society has gathered weekly in Victoria to openly defy prohibition laws and promote the legalization of marijuana (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cannabis_legalization_in_Canada). This group has involved itself with city politics in an attempt to increase its support.[7] (http://www.city.victoria.bc.ca/cityhall/minutes_council/min030410_cnc.pdf)[8] (http://cannabisculture.com/articles/1902.html)[9] (http://db.etree.org/lookup_show.php?shows_key=49015)
Notable people born in Greater Victoria include:

Emily Carr (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emily_Carr)
Russ Courtnall (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russ_Courtnall)
Geoff Courtnall (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoff_Courtnall)
David Foster (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Foster)
Nelly Furtado (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nelly_Furtado)
Carolyn Mark (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carolyn_Mark)
Michael D. Moore (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_D._Moore)
Rich Harden (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rich_Harden)
Nell Shipman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nell_Shipman)
Cliff Thorburn (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cliff_Thorburn)
Ian Tyson (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ian_Tyson) NBA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NBA) star Steve Nash (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Nash), although born in South Africa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Africa), grew up in Victoria, BC.
[edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Victoria%2C_British_Columbia&action=edit&section=7)]

Sister cities

Victoria has four Sister Cities (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sister_City):


(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Flag_of_New_Zealand.svg) Napier (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napier%2C_New_Zealand), New Zealand (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand)

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Flag_of_the_People%27s_Republic_of_China.svg ) Suzhou (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzhou), China (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/People%27s_Republic_of_China)

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Flag_of_Russia.svg) Khabarovsk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khabarovsk%2C_Russia), Russia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russia)

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Flag_of_Japan.svg) Morioka (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morioka%2C_Iwate), Japan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan) (other sister cities in Japan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_sister_cities_in_Japan) ) [edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Victoria%2C_British_Columbia&action=edit&section=8)]

Sports teams


Victoria Salmon Kings (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Salmon_Kings) (ECHL (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ECHL))
Victoria Grizzlies (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Grizzlies) (British Columbia Hockey League (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Columbia_Hockey_League))
Victoria Shamrocks (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Shamrocks) (Western Lacrosse Association (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Lacrosse_Association))
Victoria Vikes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Vikes) teams at the University of Victoria (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Victoria)
The Victoria Cougars (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Cougars) are perhaps the most famous sports franchise the city has known, winning the Stanley Cup (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanley_Cup) as members of the PCHA (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PCHA) in 1925. They exist today in the form of a Junior 'B' team playing in the Vancouver Island Junior Hockey League (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vancouver_Island_Junior_Hockey_League).
NASCAR (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NASCAR) driver Rick O'Dell (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rick_O%27Dell) is from the city. [edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Victoria%2C_British_Columbia&action=edit&section=9)]

Media outlets

[edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Victoria%2C_British_Columbia&action=edit&section=10)]

Print


Victoria Times-Colonist (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_Times-Colonist)
Monday Magazine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monday_Magazine)
The Martlet (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Martlet) - UVic student newspaper
Black Press (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Press) [edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Victoria%2C_British_Columbia&action=edit&section=11)]

AM radio


AM (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AM_radio) 900 - CKMO (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CKMO_%28AM%29), Camosun College (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camosun_College) campus radio (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campus_radio)
AM 1070 - CFAX (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CFAX_%28AM%29), news (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/News)/talk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk_radio) [edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Victoria%2C_British_Columbia&action=edit&section=12)]

FM radio


FM (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FM_radio) 90.5 - CBCV (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CBCV-FM), CBC Radio One (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CBC_Radio_One)
FM 91.3 - CJZN (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CJZN-FM) (The Zone @ 91-3), modern rock (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modern_rock)
FM 92.1 - CBU-2 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CBU-FM), CBC Radio Two (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CBC_Radio_Two)
FM 98.5 - CIOC (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CIOC-FM) (Ocean 98.5), soft adult contemporary (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soft_adult_contemporary)
FM 100.3 - CKKQ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CKKQ-FM) (100.3 The Q!), active adult rock (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Active_adult_rock&action=edit)
FM 101.9 - CFUV (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CFUV-FM), University of Victoria (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_Victoria) campus radio (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campus_radio)
FM 103.1 - CHTT (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CHTT-FM) (Jack FM (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_FM)), adult hits (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adult_hits)
FM 107.3 - CHBE (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=CHBE-FM&action=edit) (Kool FM), hot adult contemporary (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hot_adult_contemporary) [edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Victoria%2C_British_Columbia&action=edit&section=13)]

Television


Channel 6: CHEK (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CHEK-TV) (CH (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CH_%28television_system%29))
Channel 53: CIVI (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CIVI-TV) (A-Channel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A-Channel))
Cable 11: "Shaw TV", Shaw Communications (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shaw_Communications) community channel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Community_channel) [edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Victoria%2C_British_Columbia&action=edit&section=14)]

See also


List of mayors of Victoria, British Columbia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mayors_of_Victoria%2C_British_Columbia)
Canadian cities (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cities_in_Canada)
School District 61 Greater Victoria (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/School_District_61_Greater_Victoria)

[edit (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Victoria%2C_British_Columbia&action=edit&section=15)]

External links


(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Commons-logo.svg)

Wikimedia Commons (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikimedia_Commons) has media related to: Victoria, British Columbia (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Victoria%2C_British_Columbia)



Maps and aerial photos (http://tools.wikimedia.de/%7Emagnus/geo/geohack.php?params=48.422151_N_-123.3657_E_%7B%7B%7B3%7D%7D%7D) Coordinates (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geographic_coordinate_system): 48.422151° -123.3657° (http://tools.wikimedia.de/%7Emagnus/geo/geohack.php?params=48.422151_N_-123.3657_E_%7B%7B%7B3%7D%7D%7D)
WikiSatellite view at WikiMapia (http://www.wikimapia.org/maps?ll=48.422151,-123.3657&spn=0.008592,0.005932&t=h)
Street map from Mapquest (http://www.mapquest.com/maps/map.adp?latlongtype=decimal&latitude=48.422151&longitude=-123.3657&zoom=6&size=big&style=RARE)
Topographic map from Topozone (http://www.topozone.com/map.asp?lat=48.422151&lon=-123.3657&s=200&size=m&layer=DRG100)
Aerial photograph from Terraserver (http://terraservice.net/map.aspx?t=1&s=14&lon=-123.3657&lat=48.422151&w=750&h=500)
Victoria Official Tourism Website (http://www.tourismvictoria.com/)
Victoria BC Travel & Tourism Information (http://victoria.travel.bc.ca/)
Victoria BC Lodging Directory (http://www.victoriabclodging.com/)
Gulch Budget Travel Guide to Victoria, BC (http://www.mentalwanderings.com/gulch_guides/victoria_bc/index.html)
Hatley Castle Official Website (http://www.hatleypark.ca/)
Ocean Island Hostel's guide to Victoria (http://www.oceanislandvictoriaguide.com/)
Victoria Official website (http://www.city.victoria.bc.ca/common/index.shtml)
Photos of Victoria - Terra Galleria (http://www.terragalleria.com/north-america/canada/victoria/)
Live Victoria events calendar (http://www.livevictoria.com/)
Bellingham to Victoria Passenger Ferry (http://www.whales.com/)
VIATeC: Technology Association and Job Links (http://www.viatec.ca/)
Victoria Sports Authority Discussion Forum (http://www.victoriasportsauthority.com/)
Extensive weather station network in the Victoria area (http://www.victoriaweather.ca/)
University of Victoria (http://www.uvic.ca/)
A History of Victoria 19th century Victoria (http://victoriasvictoria.ca/)
Victoria Photos (http://www.goseevictoria.ca/) — Categorized photos of Victoria and region
^ (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria%2C_British_Columbia#_ref-0) Thunderbird Park – A Place of Cultural Sharing (http://www.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca/exhibits/tbird-park/index.html). Royal British Columbia Museum (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_British_Columbia_Museum). Retrieved on 2006 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006)-06-24 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/June_24). House built by Mungo Martin and David Martin with carpenter Robert J. Wallace. Based on Chief Nakap'ankam's house in Tsaxis (Fort Rupert (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Fort_Rupert&action=edit)). The house "bears on its house-posts the hereditary crests of Martin's family." It continues to be used for ceremonies with the permission of Chief Oast'akalagalis 'Walas 'Namugwis (Peter Knox, Martin's grandson) and Mable Knox. Pole carved by Mungo Martin, David Martin and Mildred Hunt. "Rather than display his own crests on the pole, which was customary, Martin chose to include crests representing the A'wa'etlala, Kwagu'l, 'Nak'waxda'xw and 'Namgis Nations. In this way, the pole represents and honours all the Kwakwaka'wakw people."

Glenn B
October 9th, 2006, 18:11
Chilliwack named themselves after the place they were from. Just like several other 70's and 80's bands: Boston, Toronto, Chilliwack...

Yup, no kidding. :eyes: As well as many others. :)

Chero-King
October 9th, 2006, 18:17
I didnt even know there was a band named Chilliwack :dunce: I guesse I'm too young.

Captain Ron
October 9th, 2006, 18:29
Other than myself :D, this is all I found.

Alaska Airlines Flight 261

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/9/99/Sundial.jpg/180px-Sundial.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Sundial.jpg) http://en.wikipedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Sundial.jpg)
The Sundial Memorial of Alsaka Airlines Flight 261.


Alaska Airlines Flight 261 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alaska_Airlines_Flight_261) was a flight route operated by Alaska Airlines (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alaska_Airlines) that provided service between Puerto Vallarta, Mexico (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puerto_Vallarta%2C_Mexico), San Francisco International Airport (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco_International_Airport) in San Francisco, California (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco%2C_California), and Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle-Tacoma_International_Airport) in Seattle, Washington (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle%2C_Washington).
On January 31, 2000, after experiencing problems with the horizontal stabilizer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horizontal_stabilizer), the flight was diverted to Los Angeles International Airport (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Angeles_International_Airport). During the diversion, the plane inverted and crashed at high speed into the Pacific Ocean (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Ocean) off the coast of Port Hueneme near Anacapa Island (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anacapa_Island) on January 31 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/January_31), 2000 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2000). Of the 83 passengers and 5 crew members on board at the time of the crash, there were no survivors.
A report by the National Transportation Safety Board (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Transportation_Safety_Board) (NTSB) attributed the crash to insufficient lubrication of the jackscrew that moves the horizontal stabilizer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horizontal_stabilizer) up and down on the MD-80 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MD-80) aircraft. After the crash, Alaska Airlines (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alaska_Airlines) retired flight number 261. The route is now known as flight 289.

--ron

planefixer
October 9th, 2006, 18:32
Colorado Springs is a large city located just east of the geographic center of the U.S. state of Colorado. It has a population of 360,890 (according to the 2000 census) making it the second largest city in Colorado and the 49th largest city in the United States. It is also a large part of the metropolitan area of the Front Range. In July 2006, Money magazine ranked Colorado Springs the best place to live in the big city category, which includes cities with 300,000 or more people. [1] The capital of Colorado, Denver, is 68 miles to the north. At an elevation of 6,035 feet, Colorado Springs is over a mile above sea level, though some areas of the city are significantly higher. The city itself is situated near the base of one of the most famous American peaks, Pikes Peak, on the east side of the Rocky Mountains. The city is the county seat of El Paso CountyGR1.

Today, Colorado Springs has many features of a modern urban area, such as parks, bike trails, urban open-area spaces, business and commerce, theatres and other entertainment. It was first established as a posh resort community and the tourist industry has remained strong and offers many activities and attractions.

Colorado Springs is also home to a large number of military installations and important national defense agencies. It is also home to the United States Air Force Academy, one of only five military academies in the entire country

History
[edit]
General William Palmer, City Founder

Garden of the Gods, a public park famous for its towering red rock formations.Colorado Springs was founded in August 1871 by General William Palmer, with the intention of creating a high quality resort community, and was soon nicknamed "Little London" because of the many English tourists who came. Nearby Pikes Peak and the Garden of the Gods made the city's location a natural.

Within two years his flagship resort the Antlers Hotel opened, welcoming U.S. and international travelers as well as health-seekers looking for the high altitude and dry climate, and Palmer's visions of a thriving, quality resort town were coming true. Soon after he founded and owned the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad, a critical regional railroad. Afterwards he maintained his presence in the city's early days by making many grants or sales of land to many important civic institutions in the community. Palmer and his wife saw Colorado Springs develop into one of the most popular travel destinations in the United States.

The town of Palmer Lake and a geographic feature called the Palmer Divide (and other more minor features) are named after him, and a bronze sculpture of Palmer on his horse is prominently displayed downtown in the center of a busy intersection.

America the Beautiful was written by visiting English professor Katharine Lee Bates in August 1893, while she stayed at the Antlers Hotel after visiting the top of nearby Pikes Peak.

Old Colorado City and the Colorado Gold Rush
Colorado Springs' present downtown location, where General Palmer first founded the city, is due to Palmer's dislike of nearby rough-and-ready Colorado City and its many saloons; Palmer ensured his new city stayed alcohol free by buying a huge tract of land to the east of Colorado City and in fact, Colorado Springs stayed dry until the end of Prohibition in 1933.

In its earliest days of 1859-1860, Colorado City was a major supply route of supplies for miners in the South Park, where a major strike in the Colorado Gold Rush was found. Routes further north from present-day Denver's area proved more effective, and as only a few very minor gold finds were made in the Pikes Peak region, commerce instead shifted towards serving the agriculture of Colorado's eastern plains. (Eventually General Palmer's Denver & Rio Grande Railroad would snake from Denver into the South Park.)

Colorado City was the county seat of El Paso County until 1873, when the courthouse moved to Colorado Springs.

Colorado City also briefly (and unofficially) served as Colorado's territorial capital starting on July 7, 1862. By this time the town's fortunes were already waning. The territorial legislature met in a log cabin on Colorado Avenue, and on August 14, 1862 the legislature approved an act which named Golden as the territorial capital. Colorado City was never recognized by the Federal government as the territorial capital.

In 1891, major gold strikes were made in Cripple Creek and Victor, on the other side of Pike's Peak from Colorado City, and suddenly supplies were needed for this last major phase of the Colorado Gold Rush and the town's big boom was on. Eventually Colorado City was processing much of the gold ore as Palmer's railroads connected the areas.

Latter 20th century military boom

Downtown Colorado Springs during the 1950s.Colorado Springs saw its first military base in 1942 shortly after Pearl Harbor was attacked. It was during this time the U.S. Army established Camp Carson near the southern borders of the city in order to train and house troops in preparation for the Second World War. It was also during this time that the Army began using at what was then and still is the Colorado Springs Municipal Airport. It was renamed Peterson Field and used as a training base for heavy bombers.

The Army then began expanding Camp Carson, a venture that increased growth in Colorado Springs and provided a significant area of industry for the city. After World War II the military stepped away from the Springs and it seemed the city's military boom was over, Camp Carson was declining and the military was activating and deactivating Peterson Field irregularly. That all changed when the Korean War erupted and the declining Camp Carson of 600 was revitalized, along with many other parts of the Springs.

After the Korean War, Peterson Field was renamed Peterson Air Force Base and was permanently activated. In 1954 Camp Carson became Fort Carson, Colorado Spring's first Army post. Later that same year, President Dwight D. Eisenhower chose, out of 300 other sites around the nation, Colorado Springs to be the site of the Air Force's military academy. With a new and growing Army post, an Air Force Base, and the Air Force's military academy, Colorado Springs' growth was jump-started.

The military boom continued and in 1963, NORAD's main facility was built in Cheyenne Mountain. It placed NORAD directly next to Colorado Springs and permanently secured the city's military presence. During the Cold War the city greatly expanded due to increased revenue from various industries and the prevailing military presence in the city. This presence was further increased in 1983 with the founding of Schriever Air Force Base, a base primarily tasked with missile defense and satellite control. Fort Carson and Peterson are still growing and continue to contribute to the city's growth. Headquarters, Air Force Space Command, is located on Peterson AFB.

[edit]
Geography and climate
[edit]
Geography

The sign greeting travelers into Colorado Springs on Interstate 25 southbound from Denver.Colorado Springs is located at 38°51′48″N, 104°47′31″W (38.863443, -104.791914)GR1.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 482.1 km² (186.1 mi²). 481.1 km² (185.7 mi²) of it is land and 1.0 km² (0.4 mi²) of it (0.21%) is water.

[edit]
Climate
Colorado Springs averages 250 days of sunshine per year, and receives 15.42 inches of annual precipitation. Average snowfall for the area (included in the previous annual precipitation calculation) is 5.5" in November, 5.7" in December, 5.0" in January, 5.1" in February, 9.4" in March, and 6.3" in April. Due to unusually low precipitation for the past few years before 2006, Colorado Springs has had to enact lawn water restrictions. Average January low and high temperatures are 14°F/ 42°F (-10°C/ 5.5°C) and average July low and high temperatures are 55°F/ 85°F (12.7°C/ 29.4°C). Traditionally, Colorado Springs has winters known as Indian Summers, where the winters are mild (except the occasional sub-zero cold snap around October 31 and March/April blizzards). The hottest temperature ever recorded in Colorado Springs was 101°F (38.3°C) on June 7, 1874 and the coldest temperature ever recorded was -32°F (-35.5°C) on January 20, 1883. Colorado Springs is also one of the most active lightning strike areas in the United States. This natural phenomenon led Nicola Tesla to select Colorado Springs as the preferred location to build his lab and study electricity.

[edit]
Demographics
As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 360,890 people, 141,516 households, and 93,117 families residing in the city. The population density was 750.2/km² (1,942.9/mi²). There were 148,690 housing units at an average density of 309.1/km² (800.5/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 80.66% White, 6.56% Black or African American, 0.88% Native American, 2.82% Asian, 0.21% Pacific Islander, 5.01% from other races, and 3.85% from two or more races. 12.01% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 141,516 households out of which 34.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.5% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.2% were non-families. 27.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the city the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 10.3% from 18 to 24, 32.8% from 25 to 44, 20.8% from 45 to 64, and 9.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 97.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $45,081, and the median income for a family was $53,478. Males had a median income of $36,786 versus $26,427 for females. The per capita income for the city was $22,496. About 6.1% of families and 8.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.8% of those under age 18 and 7.2% of those age 65 or over.

[edit]
Attractions and entertainment
[edit]
Tourism and attractions

Downtown Colorado Springs today.Much of the Springs tourism comes from the area it was built around, most famously Pikes Peak. The city is host to numerous trails and parks due to its close proximity to the Rocky Mountains, making the city a popular destination for its scenery. With the mountains as close as they are the Springs has also gained notority for its rock formations and other geological features. There are many attractions in the area, including:

American Numismatic Association
The Broadmoor Hotel, a luxury hotel/resort rated Five-Star by Mobil and Five-Diamond by AAA, every year.[3]
Cave of the Winds
The Cheyenne Mountain Zoo, billed as the nation's only 'mountain zoo,' is situated, essentially, on the side of Cheyenne Mountain.
The Citadel Mall [4]
Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center
Flying W Ranch, a cowboy ranch.
Focus on the Family visitor center and tours of facilities
Garden of the Gods, a collection of large red sandstone formations
Glen Eyrie, home to William Jackson Palmer, the founder of Colorado Springs, now owned by The Navigators - tours available
Lon Chaney Theater
Manitou and Pike's Peak Railway - ascends to the summit of 14,115 foot tall Pikes Peak
Manitou Cliff Dwellings
Michelle's, a 50+ year old ice cream parlor featured in Life Magazine
Old Colorado City district
Pikes Peak Center
Pioneer's Museum
ProRodeo Hall of Fame and Museum of the American Cowboy
Security Service Field, home of the baseball club Colorado Springs Sky Sox, AAA affiliate of the Colorado Rockies
Seven Falls
United States Air Force Academy
United States Olympic Training Center [5]
The Van Briggle Pottery, founded in 1899 and still operating, specializing in art nouveau vases and decorative tiles.
The World Arena
According to the Colorado Springs Convention & Visitors Bureau, the area attracts some six million visitors yearly.

[edit]
Orchestras
Colorado Springs Philharmonic
Colorado Springs Youth Symphony
Pikes Peak Philharmonic
Chamber Orchestra of the Springs
[edit]
Choirs
Colorado Springs Children's Chorale
Sports teams
Name Sport Founded League Venue
Colorado Springs Sky Sox Baseball 1950 Minor league; Pacific Coast League Security Service Field
Colorado Springs Blizzard Soccer 2004 United Soccer Leagues; USL Premier Development League Security Service Field
Colorado Springs Cricket Club Cricket 1999 Colorado Cricket League

The local colleges feature many sports teams. Notable among them are the following nationally-competitive NCAA Division I teams: United States Air Force Academy (Fighting Falcons) Football, Basketball and Hockey, Colorado College (Tigers) Hockey, and Women's Soccer.
Colorado Springs hosted the 1962 International Ice Hockey Federation World Championships (together with Denver).
This nullifies a popular Canadian claim that the 2008 IIHF World Championships in Quebec City, PQ and Halifax, NS will mark the first time this event is organized on the American continent.

[edit]
Economy
Colorado Springs' economy is driven primarily by the military, the high-tech industry, and tourism, in that order. While the main force behind the city's economy is the military, the city is not completely dependent on it. The city is currently experiencing growth and has been identified as one of the nation's top ten fastest growing economies.[8]

[edit]
Defense industry
The defense industry is the largest portion of Colorado Springs' economy with several of the largest employers coming from this sector.[9] A large portion of this industry is dedicated to the development and operation of various projects of the missile defense agency. The aerospace industry also has had an influence on the Colorado Springs economy. The defense sector has planned several changes, moving in and out personnel, building and shutting down, in the next few years. Still, they are the largest employers in the city and is increasing in the long run.

Defense corporations with ties to the city include:

Northrop Grumman, one of the largest employers in the city
Lockheed Martin
Boeing
[edit]
High-tech industry
A large percentage of Colorado Springs' economy is based on high tech and manufacturing. The high tech sector of Colorado Springs is also increasing its overall percentage in the Springs' economy, notably in biotech and semiconductor manufacturing. [citation needed] Due to the slowdown in tourism, the high tech sector now ranks second to the military in terms of total revenue generated and employment. [citation needed]It is projected that this employment ratio will stay constant for the near future. [citation needed] Besides the high tech sector, there are also several research and development firms located in Colorado Springs. [citation needed]

Because of Colorado Springs’ central U.S. location, availability of educated workers, and business climate, several companies have plans either to expand their current operations in Colorado Springs or have considered Colorado Springs as a competitive area for relocating or opening a business. On Oct 04, 2006, Steve Fehl of the Pikes Peak Workforce Center announced that the growing high tech sector in Colorado Springs has recovered around a quarter of the 10,000 IT jobs lost in the last 2000-2001 High-tech unemployment cycle in Colorado Springs.[citation needed] Also, in Sept 2006, Steve Fehl of the PPWFC announced that the availability of well educated high tech workers in Colorado Springs, is 12th out of 25 cities in the USA.[citation needed]


High tech corporations with connections to the city include:

Verizon– Software development - Formally WorldCom and MCI, has a fairly large engineering presence
Hewlett-Packard – Computing – large sales, support, and SAN storage engineering center. The location was built by Digital Equipment Corporation, renamed Compaq in the 1998 acquisition of Digital, and finally renamed Hewlett-Packard after the 2002 merger.
SNIA – Computing - home of the SNIA Technology Center
Agilent – Manufacturing - HP operated a larger facility in the area that was later renamed Agilent in a spinoff.
Intel – Chip fabrication, built in 2000, plans to complete their facility and possibly expand[citation needed]
Atmel – Chip fabrication. Formally Honeywell
Cypress Semiconductor Colorado Design Center – Chip fabrication R&D site
[edit]
Olympic Sports
Colorado Springs is home to the United States Olympic Training Center and the headquarters of the United States Olympic Committee. In addition, a number of United States national federations for individual Olympic sports have their headquarters in Colorado Springs, including:

United States Fencing Association
United States Figure Skating Association
USA Basketball
USA Cycling
USA Hockey
USA Swimming
The city has a particularly long association with the sport of figure skating, having hosted the U.S. Figure Skating Championships 6 times and the World Figure Skating Championships 5 times. It is home to the World Figure Skating Museum and Hall of Fame and the Broadmoor Skating Club, a notable training center for the sport. In recent years, the World Arena has hosted skating events such as Skate America and the Four Continents Figure Skating Championships.

[edit]
Military
The United States Military plays a very important role in the city. Colorado Springs is home to both Army and Air Force bases and their numerous support bases around the county. Fort Carson, the city's biggest military base, was home to the 3rd ACR and will be home to 4th Infantry, boosting the city's population. The city is host to many various training grounds for infantry, armor, and attack helicopters (specifically the AH-64 Apache). Fort Carson is also the headquarters of the 10th Special Forces Group's second and third battalion, two of the three battalions of the 10th.

The Air Force has a few critical aspects of their service based at Colorado Springs which carry on missile defense operations and development. The Air Force bases a large section of the nation's national missile defense operations, with many parts such as NORAD and Peterson set to operate large sections of the program. Peterson AFB is currently the headquarters of the Air Force's major command Air Force Space Command, the highest level of command in the Air Force. Also, Schriever AFB operates two global positioning system satellites used by the Air Force to direct and command various operations. Schriever is also devolping parts of national missile defense and runs parts of the annual wargames used by the nations military.

[edit]
NORAD
Colorado Springs is the site of the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD), a component of America's missile defense system. When it was built, at the height of the Cold War era, it caused much anxiety for the residents of Colorado Springs. Many believed that if World War III started, theirs would be the first city hit. [citation needed] NORAD still operates but is somewhat less vital to American defense than in previous years. Today it is primarily tasked with the tracking of ICBMs, but the military has recently decided to put Cheyenne Mountain on standby and move operations to nearby Peterson Air Force Base. [9]

Military installations in and around the city include:

United States Air Force Academy – Tasked primarily with training Air Force officers.
Cheyenne Mountain Air Station – Air Force: a major military center, home of NORAD (North American Aerospace Defense Command), it is housed in Cheyenne Mountain, south of Pikes Peak.
Peterson Air Force Base – Headquarters of Air Force Space Command
Schriever Air Force Base – Air Force
Fort Carson – Army

Colorado Springs in fiction
Clive Cussler sets a chapter of his thriller "Cyclops" in Colorado Springs, featuring an action scene between the President's personal investigator and a man supposedly involved in a top secret colony on the moon.
Robert A. Heinlein, noted sci-fi writer during the genre's Golden Age, lived in Colorado Springs during part of his career. His novel The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress featured at one point the rebel moon government raining rock-filled grain canisters down on NORAD's headquarters inside Cheyenne Mountain, incidentally destroying Colorado Springs because of the great amount of kinetic energy released on impact.
Peanuts creator Charles M. Schulz lived briefly in Colorado Springs in 1951, on North Franklin Street. Linus and Lucy Van Pelt were neighbors of his, for whom he named characters. He painted a wall of his home with some Peanuts characters. The wall was removed from the home in 2001 and donated to the Charles M. Schulz Museum in Santa Rosa, California.
Several scenes of Perry Mason: The Case of the Sinister Spirit (1987) were filmed at the Broadmoor Hotel. Several courtroom scenes in the Perry Mason movie series were filmed in the courtroom exhibit at the Pioneer's Museum (formerly the El Paso County Courthouse).
Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, an Emmy Award-winning dramatic television series starring Jane Seymour, was set in this town. Though there was some historical accuracy, the majority of the events and settings were fictional, and actual filming was done at the Paramount Ranch near Agoura Hills, California.
The TV series Stargate SG-1 has several episodes which at least partially take place in Colorado Springs; additionally SGC is based out of nearby Cheyenne Mountain, and most of the team members are shown to reside in Colorado Springs.
The movie Independence Day makes reference to the destruction of NORAD.
In the movie The Sum Of All Fears the Russian president asks a military advisor how many people live in Colorado Springs, as he weighs the ramifications in the use of nuclear weapons against the city. This highlights the strategic importance of the military-centered city.
The film WarGames featured the NORAD facility quite prominently, even though only exterior shots were actually filmed on location.
[edit]
Trivia
Lon Chaney was born in Colorado Springs on April 1, 1883. The Lon Chaney Theatre is named for him.
Cassandra Peterson (also known as Elvira, Mistress of the Night) attended General William J. Palmer High School in downtown Colorado Springs. She graduated in the class of 1969.
Leeann Tweeden worked briefly as a waitress at a local Hooters in the 1991-1992 timeframe.
Bobby Unser was born in Colorado Springs on February 20, 1934.
Actors Michael Boatman and Chase Masterson are from Colorado Springs.
Serbian-born American physicist Nikola Tesla built a laboratory in Colorado Springs in 1899 for his experiments in the wireless transmission of electrical power. Reportedly he shot lightning from his lab back into the sky during a lightning storm. The site of the lab is now a residential area. The address is the intersection of Foote and Kiowa streets.
Professional kickboxer, wrestler and actor Bob "The Beast" Sapp was born in Colorado Springs and attended Mitchel High School.
WWE Superstar Bobby Lashley is from Colorado Springs.
Kelsey Grammer's sister was murdered after leaving a Red Lobster in Colorado Springs, Colorado [10].

IMORTL
October 9th, 2006, 19:26
No trivia link but I came up with this...

Famous People Born in Fullerton
Jenna Haze, Pornographic actress, Won AVN Award Best New Starlet in 2003.



LOL

some one at Wiki knows thier porn

OT
October 9th, 2006, 19:28
LOL

some one at Wiki knows thier porn
Actually, you can ad any info you feel is relevant to any subject on Wikipedia.
Just hit one of the edit buttons.

97XJ_Sport
October 9th, 2006, 23:02
Duncanville is a city in Dallas County, Texas (USA). Duncanville's population was 36,081 at the 2000 census. Duncanville is a suburb of Dallas, and is part of the Tri-city area, which includes Duncanville, Cedar Hill, and DeSoto.



Duncanville is located at 32°38′47″N, 96°54′41″W (32.646333, -96.911309)GR1.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 29.2 km² (11.3 mi²), all land.

[edit]
Demographics
As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 36,081 people, 12,896 households, and 10,239 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,233.9/km² (3,196.6/mi²). There were 13,290 housing units at an average density of 454.5/km² (1,177.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 63.90% White, 24.76% African American, 0.32% Native American, 1.99% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 6.83% from other races, and 2.11% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 15.30% of the population.

There were 12,896 households out of which 38.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.3% were married couples living together, 16.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.6% were non-families. 17.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.15.

In the city the population was spread out with 28.1% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 27.7% from 25 to 44, 26.1% from 45 to 64, and 9.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 90.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $51,654, and the median income for a family was $57,064. Males had a median income of $39,199 versus $30,145 for females. The per capita income for the city was $22,924. About 3.9% of families and 6.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.2% of those under age 18 and 3.6% of those age 65 or over.

[edit]
Education
Most of Duncanville is served by the Duncanville Independent School District. Parts of Duncanville are served by the Dallas Independent School District.

The Duncanville ISD portion is zoned to Duncanville High School, which enrolls over 2500 students annually [2].

[edit]
Nicknames
D'ville
Little D
City of Champions [1] (Duncanville sports teams, most notably its girls basketball team, have won several state championships; the Duncanville High School band is nationally recognized)
The Superb Suburb
Drunkenville (Duncanville is one of the few non-prohibition ("wet") cities in the immediate area)
[edit]
Military
The Air Force had a RADAR station base in the middle of the city; most of the land later became city or school district facilities.

jfox21
October 10th, 2006, 03:03
History

Walnut Creek was first known as "The Corners," where two roads leading from Pacheco and Lafayette met. This Corner is now known as the Mt. Diablo Boulevard and North Main Street intersection. The first settler of the area was William Slusher, who built a dwelling on the bank of Walnut Creek, which was then known as "Nuts Creek" in 1849. Today, Walnut Creek has been routed underneath downtown through a series of tunnels starting at the southwest end of Macy's and ending just southwest of The Cantina Restaurant. Slusher's dwelling was built in the area of modern-day Liberty Bell Plaza.
Downtown Walnut Creek, Main Street
Enlarge
Downtown Walnut Creek, Main Street

Milo Hough of Lafayette built the hotel named "Walnut Creek House" in the corners in 1855. A blacksmith shop and a store sprouted up, and a year later, Hiram Penniman (who built Shadelands Ranch) laid out the town site and realigned today's Main Street.

In December 1862 a U.S. Post Office was established, around which the community was named "Walnut Creek." The downtown street patterns laid out by pioneer Homer Shuey on a portion of one of his family's large cattle ranches in 1871-1872 are still present today.

On October 21, 1914, the town and the surrounding area of 500 acres (2 km²), were incorporated as the 8th city in Contra Costa County, California. Politically, Walnut Creek used to be a Republican stronghold, but is increasingly leaning Democratic.

Walnut Creek has recently undergone major development in its downtown area, which growing cities throughout the nation have looked to as a model.
[edit]

Geography
Location of Walnut Creek, California
Enlarge
Location of Walnut Creek, California

Walnut Creek is located at 37°54′36″N, 122°2′51″W (37.909956, -122.047373)GR1. It is located in a large valley (The Ygnacio Valley)below the western slopes of Mount Diablo.
Walnut Creek as seen from Mount Diablo
Enlarge
Walnut Creek as seen from Mount Diablo

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 51.6 km² (19.9 mi²). 51.6 km² (19.9 mi²) of it is land and 0.05% is water.


[edit]

Open space
Canal trail near Walnut Creek Open Space
Enlarge
Canal trail near Walnut Creek Open Space

Walnut Creek owns more open space per capita than any other community in the state of California, except Palo Alto. In 1974, Walnut Creek voters approved a $6.7 million bond measure that allowed the city to purchase 1,800 acres (7 km²) of undeveloped hillsides, ridge lines, and park sites. Walnut Creek owns parts of Lime Ridge Open Space, Shell Ridge Open Space, Acalanes Ridge Open Space, and Sugarloaf Openspace. There is also open space in the retirement community, Rossmoor.
[edit]

Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 64,296 people, 30,301 households, and 16,544 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,246.9/km² (3,229.6/mi²). There were 31,425 housing units at an average density of 609.4/km² (1,578.5/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 83.89% White, 1.07% African American, 0.33% Native American, 9.36% Asian, 0.15% Pacific Islander, 1.96% from other races, and 3.25% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.99% of the population.
Northgate community, looking towards Mt. Diablo
Enlarge
Northgate community, looking towards Mt. Diablo

There were 30,301 households out of which 20.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.7% were married couples living together, 6.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 45.4% were non-families. 38.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 19.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.09 and the average family size was 2.78.

In the city the population was spread out with 17.6% under the age of 18, 5.2% from 18 to 24, 27.1% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 25.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females there were 85.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $63,238, and the median income for a family was $83,794. Males had a median income of $66,482 versus $45,220 for females. The per capita income for the city was $39,875. About 1.7% of families and 3.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.1% of those under age 18 and 3.6% of those age 65 or over.
Downtown Walnut Creek
Enlarge
Downtown Walnut Creek
[edit]

Culture

The California Symphony (notable for its commitment to the performance of music by American composers) has been based in Walnut Creek since its inception in 1986.
[edit]

Points of interest

* Castle Rock Park
* Gardens at Heather Farm
* Mount Diablo
* Civic Park
* Dean Lesher Regional Center for the Arts
* Ruth Bancroft Garden
* Shadelands Museum
* Old Borges Ranch
* Broadway Plaza and Walnut Creek Downtown
* Diablo Valley Lines (Walnut Creek Model Railroad Society) [1]
* Lindsay Wildlife Museum
my oh so exciting home
[edit]

Famous citizens

* Corey Duffel, professional skateboarder. born and raised in Walnut Creek.
* Alice Greczyn, actress, was born in Walnut Creek.
* Jeff Hunter, founder and head administrator of TOTSE.
* Randy Johnson, professional baseball player, was born in Walnut Creek.
* Jason Newsted, former bassist of the heavy metal band Metallica, currently lives in Walnut Creek.
* Shoshannah Stern, actress, was born in Walnut Creek.
* Christy Turlington, model, was born in Walnut Creek.
* Philip Wang, founder of Wong Fu Productions, was born and raised in Walnut Creek.

Kittrell
October 10th, 2006, 04:29
Lone Tree, Colorado

Lone Tree is a city in Douglas County, Colorado, United States. As of 2005, the city is estimated to have a total population of 8,554.


Geography
Location of Lone Tree, Colorado

Lone Tree is located at 39°32′56″N, 104°53′33″W (39.548947, -104.892546)GR1. It is on the northern border of Douglas County, and directly adjacent to Arapahoe County. It is in what is called the 'south metro' area of Denver, and is a suburb of Denver.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.5 km² (1.7 mi²), all land.
[edit]

Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 4,873 people, 1,848 households, and 1,367 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,093.9/km² (2,827.2/mi²). There were 1,906 housing units at an average density of 427.9/km² (1,105.8/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 91.55% White, 1.48% African American, 0.25% Native American, 3.69% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 1.31% from other races, and 1.68% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.58% of the population.

There were 1,848 households out of which 38.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.0% were married couples living together, 4.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.0% were non-families. 19.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 1.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the city the population was spread out with 28.3% under the age of 18, 5.4% from 18 to 24, 34.5% from 25 to 44, 28.0% from 45 to 64, and 3.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 98.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $96,308, and the median income for a family was $109,003. Males had a median income of $90,690 versus $43,125 for females. The per capita income for the city was $46,287. About 1.2% of families and 1.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.5% of those under age 18 and 3.7% of those age 65 or over.

Thats all we have...............:speepin:

Some more random chit

Crime in Lone Tree (2002):

* 0 murders (0.0 per 100,000)
* 0 rapes (0.0 per 100,000)
* 2 robberies (39.2 per 100,000)
* 8 assaults (156.7 per 100,000)
* 26 burglaries (509.2 per 100,000)
* 276 thefts (5405.4 per 100,000)
* 33 auto thefts (646.3 per 100,000)

Single-family new house construction building permits:

* 1998: 15 buildings, average cost: $217,300
* 1999: 38 buildings, average cost: $136,400
* 2000: 13 buildings, average cost: $267,700
* 2001: 16 buildings, average cost: $271,000
* 2002: 41 buildings, average cost: $360,400
* 2003: 44 buildings, average cost: $375,600
* 2004: 167 buildings, average cost: $247,300
* 2005: 133 buildings, average cost: $289,800

Lone Tree-area historical tornado activity is above Colorado state average. It is 60% greater than the overall U.S. average.

On 6/15/1988, a category 3 (max. wind speeds 158-206 mph) tornado 12.8 miles away from the Lone Tree city center injured 7 people and caused between $5,000,000 and $50,000,000 in damages.

On 5/18/1975, a category 3 tornado 20.6 miles away from the city center .

Art Triggs
October 10th, 2006, 05:37
Pawling (town), New York

Pawling is a town in Dutchess County, New York, USA. The population was 7,521
at the 2000 census. The town is named after Catherine Pawling,
the daughter of Henry Beekman, who held the second largest land
patent in the county.

The Town of Pawling is in the southeast part of the county.
The town has a village of Pawling.


History

A part of the town was involved in a boundary problem involving New York
and Connecticut. A section of the town, "the Oblong," was settled by
Quakers in the 18th Century, probably around 1720. George Washington
established his headquarters in the town for two months.
The town was founded in 1788, but part of the town was used to
form the Town of Dover in 1807.

The town's burial place, Pawling Cemetery, located on the west Side of
Route 22, is the final resting place for New York Governor and
Presidential Candidate Thomas E. Dewey (1902-1971)
(best known for the erroneous headline of "Dewey Defeats Truman" during
the 1948 United States Presidential race),
United States Navy Rear Admiral John Lorimer Worden (1818-1897),
commander of the ironclad USS Monitor during the American Civil War,
motion picture actress Silvana Mangano (1930-1989),
Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient John J. Toffey (1844-1911)
,and United States Congressman Ralph Waldo Gwinn (1884-1962),
who represented New York's 27th District from 1945 to 1959.


Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area
of 116.5 km² (45.0 mi²). 114.4 km² (44.2 mi²) of it is land and 2.1 km²
(0.8 mi²) of it (1.80%) is water.
The south town line is the border of Putnam County, New York,
and the east town line is the border of Connecticut.

Demographics

As of the census2 of 2000, there were 7,521 people, 2,823 households,
and 1,987 families residing in the town. The population density was
65.7/km² (170.2/mi²). There were 3,101 housing units at an average
density of 27.1/km² (70.2/mi²). The racial makeup of the town was
94.43% White, 1.46% Black or African American, 0.17% Native American,
1.28% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 1.30% from other races, and 1.32%
from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.85% of
the population.

There were 2,823 households out of which 33.8% had children under
the age of 18 living with them, 59.6% were married couples living
together, 7.4% had a female householder with no husband present,
and 29.6% were non-families. 24.7% of all households were made up
of individuals and 10.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years
of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average
family size was 3.16.

In the town the population was spread out with 25.3% under the age
of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 29.3% from 25 to 44, 24.9% from 45 to 64,
and 15.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40
years. For every 100 females there were 95.8 males. For every 100
females age 18 and over, there were 92.4 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $61,380, and
the median income for a family was $70,056. Males had a median
income of $47,143 versus $35,063 for females. The per capita
income for the town was $30,043. About 1.7% of families and 3.3%
of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.2% of
those under age 18 and 4.1% of those age 65 or over.

:speepin:

Ghost
October 10th, 2006, 08:52
I'll bite....

Hartsville, South Carolina
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Hartsville, SC)
Jump to: navigation, search
Hartsville is a city in Darlington County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 7,556 at the 2000 census (14,907 total pop. of Hartsville Urban Cluster) and is part of the Florence Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents [hide]
1 Geography
2 Demographics
3 History
4 Shopping in Hartsville
5 Schools in Hartsville
6 Dining in Hartsville
7 Points of interest
8 External links



[edit]
Geography
Hartsville is located at 34°22′10″N, 80°4′51″W (34.369474, -80.080783)GR1.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 13.0 km² (5.0 mi²). 12.9 km² (5.0 mi²) of it is land and 0.1 km² (0.04 mi²) of it (0.60%) is water.

[edit]
Demographics
As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 7,556 people (estimated as 7,429 in 2004), 3,044 households, and 1,935 families residing in the city. The population density was 585.8/km² (1,516.9/mi²). There were 3,499 housing units at an average density of 271.3/km² (702.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the city was 56.00% White, 42.47% African American, 0.09% Native American, 0.62% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.19% from other races, and 0.61% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.83% of the population.

There were 3,044 households out of which 28.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.6% were married couples living together, 22.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.4% were non-families. 33.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the city the population was spread out with 25.0% under the age of 18, 11.1% from 18 to 24, 24.7% from 25 to 44, 21.5% from 45 to 64, and 17.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 78.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 71.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $26,063, and the median income for a family was $38,877. Males had a median income of $42,295 versus $22,583 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,318. About 21.6% of families and 25.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 34.5% of those under age 18 and 21.7% of those age 65 or over.

Hartsville is the largest town in Darlington County.

Major industries include: Sonoco Products, & Progress Energy.

[edit]
History
Hartsville is generally credited as a company town that grew up around Southern Novelty company (later named Sonoco Products Company) founded by Col. Lide Coker who developed a way to make paper from pine pulp.

[edit]
Shopping in Hartsville
Due to Hartsville's large population of affluent people many of the businesses in Hartsville have designed themselves to target them, sometimes exclusively. As a result Hartsville is an ideal place to find shops that sell items not commonly found elsewhere, just don't expect the downtown specialty shops to be open past 5:00PM. In fact many businesses close their doors at 5:00. Whether this is because of any perceived demographic not shopping during that time, or that in fact the majority of people in Hartsville shop during business hours is a question. The result however is that the downtown shops with the exception of a handful do not cater to the 8-5 employee, nor do many of the other businesses in town. Fortunately for those people there is the 24hour Super Wal-Mart at the edge of town that has many of the same items for half the price.

Burry is the only one Bookstore in Hartsville. Their large selection of books is complemented by Hallmark ornaments sold in the store as well. You can generally find best sellers and new releases at Burry.

[edit]
Schools in Hartsville
Hartsville Middle School, Hartsville High School, Thornwell School for the Arts, Carolina Elementary School, West Hartsville Elem., North Hartsville Elem., Washington Street Elem., Coker College, Thomas Hart Academy, Emmanuel Christian School, the South Carolina Governor's School for Science and Mathematics, and several others.

[edit]
Dining in Hartsville
There are several excellent restaurants in Hartsville, with the best service surprisingly being at the ethnic restaurants in the area. Fugi, Win Buffet, Rancho Grande, and Los Tres Hermanos. Another is the Midnight Rooster that caters to the college crowd. The Rooster is a small coffee shop and eatery located in the downtown area. If you have any respiratory issues however getting into the place might be problematic as smoking and coffee seems to be the thing to do outside it's doors. Others of note include Shugs Smokehouse, located south of town on Kellytown Road and Bizzels located in the heart of town on Carolina Ave.

[edit]
Points of interest
Kalmia Gardens
Coker College
Hartsville Museum
GSSM
[edit]
External links
Maps and aerial photos Coordinates: 34.369474° -80.080783°
Street map from Google Maps, or Yahoo! Maps, or Windows Live Local
Satellite image from Google Maps, Windows Live Local, WikiMapia
Topographic map from TopoZone
Aerial image or topographic map from TerraServer-USA
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hartsville%2C_South_Carolina"

Rob Mayercik
October 10th, 2006, 11:01
Home to the first Blimpie (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blimpie) restaurant, opened in 1964. Originally located on Sixth and Washington Street, before relocating a year later two doors down to the corner of Seventh and Washington, then, in the mid-1990s, to First and Washington. A free goldfish in a colored bowl of water was given to all customers who purchased a Blimpie during the first week open.
A post-apocalyptic Hoboken is the setting of the offbeat computer RPG The Superhero League of Hoboken (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=The_Superhero_League_of_Hoboken&action=edit), by Legend Entertainment (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legend_Entertainment).

Ah, Hoboken - to borrow from my alma mater, "I'm a rambling wreck from Stevens Tech" (no, I'm not stealing that from Georgia Tech - they stole it from us! Someone at Stevens did a doctoral thesis on the matter some years back, and proved it.)

I remember Blimpie well - it relocated from 7th and Washington around 1996. Got subs there several times.

Now, as to "The Superhero League of Hoboken" - my God, it's been a while since I saw that name pop up anywhere. I think I might still have my bootleg copy of it floating around (got it off a friend for the novelty). Have to go looking for it some day (probably on one of those old QIC tapes...

Rob

Billfaceeee
October 28th, 2006, 21:18
Moorpark, California

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Moorpark is a city located in Ventura County, California (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ventura_County%2C_California). As of the 2000 census (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_2000_Census), the city had a total population of 31,415.

Geography

Moorpark is located at 34°16'52" North, 118°52'25" West (34.281056, -118.873561)GR1 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Geographic_references#1)
According to the United States Census Bureau (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Census_Bureau), the city has a total area of 49.9 km² (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Square_kilometer) (19.3 mi² (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Square_mile)). 49.3 km² (19.0 mi²) of it is land and 0.6 km² (0.2 mi²) of it is water. The total area is 1.30% water.

Random Facts


The Moorpark High School football team is the Moorpark Musketeers.

The hard rock (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hard_rock) group Avenged Sevenfold (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avenged_Sevenfold) played some of their first gigs (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Gigs&action=edit) there.
Moorpark's Little League (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_League) won the Western Regional Championships in 1996.
Moorpark High School won third place in the state Academic Decathlon in the school year 2005-2006.
Moorpark was the first city in the United States to receive all its electricity from Nuclear Power (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_Power). This happened in 1957 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1957)
In February 2005 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/February_2005), a Tiger (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiger) who escaped from a local home was shot and killed in one of Moorpark's parks. This created local uproar, because the Animal Control (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animal_Control) officers used a gun instead of a Tranquilizer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tranquilizer). Candlelight Vigil (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Candlelight_Vigil&action=edit) memorials were held for the tiger, who was named "Tuffy".
There is an alleged "Gravity Hill (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravity_Hill)", north of Moorpark, near California State Route 23 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_State_Route_23). Legend says that in the 1940s (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1940s) a School Bus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/School_Bus) broke down at the bottom of a hill, and the children got out of the bus to help push it back up the hill. A tractor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tractor) from a nearby farm ran over some of the children by accident and killed them, so today, if you put your car in neutral at the bottom of the hill, the ghosts (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghosts) of the children will push you back up the hill. (This is a dangerous thing to do, as the hill is near a rock quarry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quarry), and there is a chance of getting hit by a semi truck (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semi_truck) carrying the rocks).
A few events are held in the Moorpark area during the year, most notably Moorpark "Country Days", a single day in late September or early October (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/October), American Civil War (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Civil_War) battle reenactments in early-November, an "Apricot Festival", usually in the Spring (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spring) or Summer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Summer), and an annual fireworks celebration on July 3 every year. The July 3 fireworks are popular around the rest of Ventura County (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ventura_County), as people can go to the Moorpark fireworks on the 3, and see their own local city's fireworks on July 4th (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/July_4th). The rock (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rock_music) band Jefferson Starship (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jefferson_Starship) played at a former Moorpark 3rd of July fireworks celebration.
In 2006 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006), Moorpark seceded (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seceded) from the Ventura County library (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Library) system to create their own city library system, much like nearby Thousand Oaks.
On February 28 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/February_28), 2006 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2006) a housing proposal, North Park Village, which would have added 1,680 houses on 3,586 acres in the north-east area of the city, was defeated by a landslide in a city election.
The city is often referred to as "Kraproom"(Moorpark spelled backwards) by its younger residents.It's the ex-hometown from 1987-2006; The tiger inncodent was funny little kid's showed up with facepaint's as tigers

Captain Ron
October 28th, 2006, 21:38
Moorpark is just like Oakview.

A refuge for Goat Ropers. :D

--ron

91G-Dub
October 29th, 2006, 11:07
Magnolia is a Borough in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the United States 2000 Census, the borough population was 4,409.

Contents [hide]
1 Geography
2 Demographics
3 Government
3.1 Local government
3.2 Federal, state and county representation
4 Education
5 References
6 External links



[edit] Geography
Magnolia is located at 39°51′18″N, 75°2′8″W (39.854880, -75.035546)GR1.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough has a total area of 2.5 km² (1.0 mi²), all land.

Magnolia borders Barrington, Gloucester Township, Lawnside, Runnemede, and Somerdale.


[edit] Demographics
As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 4,409 people, 1,710 households, and 1,162 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,755.0/km² (4,543.3/mi²). There were 1,836 housing units at an average density of 730.8/km² (1,891.9/mi²). The racial makeup of the borough was 77.00% White, 17.80% African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.93% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.54% from other races, and 2.47% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.06% of the population.

There were 1,710 households out of which 30.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.4% were married couples living together, 15.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.0% were non-families. 25.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the borough the population was spread out with 24.7% under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 33.2% from 25 to 44, 21.4% from 45 to 64, and 12.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 93.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.8 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $43,728, and the median income for a family was $50,791. Males had a median income of $38,480 versus $27,172 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $19,032. About 5.9% of families and 7.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.9% of those under age 18 and 5.0% of those age 65 or over.

Cameano
October 29th, 2006, 16:29
Pia Zadora (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pia_Zadora), singer and actress.(B)

She used to be sooo hot. :loveu: